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NEWSLETTER

BRANDYWINE CRUCIBLE

Contents

  1. - Membership

  2. - Reunions

  3. - Presidents Letter

  4. - Projects & Committees 7 - Military Project

8 - Cox Family Liaisons 9 - Announcements

12 - Family Memories 14 - Family History 17 - Family Stories 18 - Young Historians 19 - Inquiries

  1. - Fun Stuff

  2. - Auto/Biographies 22 - Family Recipes 23 - Research Links

24 - Guide to Family Papers 25 - County History

26 - Cemetery History

29 - In Remembrance 34 - Books Available

35 - Headstone/Marker Proj.


Officers

President: Joe B. Cox Jr. Vice-President: Gary Sutton Secretary: Lisa Sullivan Treasurer: Linda Atkins Newsletter: Debbie B. Cox Directors:

Marty Burnett

John Cox Janice Jenkins Ada Stump Dave Turner


Physical Year: May31st-Jun1st

VOLUME I4 ISSUE 2 Fall/Winter 2018


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2018 Brandywine Cox Family Reunion

The annual Brandywine Cox Family Reunion was held, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, June 1st-3rd in Lampasas, Texas. The new venue, Bar 17 on the courthouse square, was the headquarters for the reunion and provided a nice setting for the family.

A cookout was held Friday evening for family and friends to gather and share a meal. Burgers and hotdogs were prepared by cook, Gary Sutton along with his wife, Joeen and Helen Cox who prepared the fixings. Catching up and dominoes were on the menu following the meal.

Guest speakers Saturday included Paul G. Noack who presented the story “Cowboys and Their Cattle Trails: South Texas to New Orleans - 1830-1860”. Paul is a researcher and presenter from Austin, Texas. Our afternoon speaker was Chris Meis of Evant, Texas. Chris is employed by the Texas Historical Commission and he spoke to us about the “Texas Archaeological Steward Network (TASN Helping Land Owners”.

Project updates were given on the DNA Project and the Military Project. Updates were given on the Brandywine Cox Family Database.

Our Sunday morning began with a family devotional and singing. Ada Cox Stump and Linda Atkins spoke to us about “A Quaker Heritage: John Cox and Mary Harlan”. Gary Sutton brought a presentation on “James Farmer -1822-1870, Texas Pioneer, Texas Hero”.

We ended our reunion with a catered lunch. Total attendance this years was forty-eight family, friends, and guests!


Membership

The Brandywine Crucible, Inc., a Cox family association, finds, collects, presents, publishes, and preserves Cox and related family histories, using research, archeology, DNA, cemetery recognition, and preservation. Please support these efforts by joining or renewing your membership. Send a deductible contribution of $15,

$25, or $100 to Brandywine Crucible, c/o Linda Atkins, 6325 Broadway Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73139-7130


Newsletter

We are always looking for submissions of family history stories and biographies, along with announcements for births, weddings, and graduations. We would also l ike to include the obituaries of our beloved family members.

Send any submissions to Debbie Brewer Cox, 708 Creekridge Drive, Goodrich, Texas 77335 or by email to: [email protected]


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A second reunion photo was taken to include those who attended on Sunday


Many family branches were represented at the reunion

Family members traveled from New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Texas to the reunion which included Steve and Linda Cox Atkins, Jeff and Linda Cox Becker, Marty Burnett, Tony and Debbie Cox, Joe and Helen Cox Jr., John and Susan Cox, Scott Cox, Kenneth and Robbie Farmer Downing, Ben Fitzgerald, grandson of John and Susan Cox, Ann Cox Gee, Carolyn Gilmore, James and Edith Hooten, Tina Cox Houy, Jerry Humphries, Janice Cox Jenkins, Lamar and Marilynn Johanson, Henryetta Kidd, Edity Kohutek, Gary and Joyce Robertson, Jerry and Melinda Schoppe, Sherri Cox Stansell, Ada Cox Stump, Lisa Sullivan and her son, Rory, Gary and Joeen Sutton, Pat Tatum and his daughter Kelly Tatum, Jimmy Tatum, Maurice and Ruby Thompson, Nell Sutton Turner, Dave Turner, and Carolyn Cox Williams.

2019 BRANDYWINE COX FAMILY REUNION — DESCENDANTS OF SOLOMON COX AND NAOMI HUSSEY


WHEN: May 31st-June 2nd, 2019

WHERE: Lampasas, Texas

LOCATION: Bar 17 Event Center, 402 South Live Oak, Lampasas, Texas CONTACTS: Linda Atkins, 405-549-6588; [email protected]

Joe Cox, 512-392-2097, [email protected]

Gary Sutton, 325-286-4005, [email protected] LODGING: Best Western Plus (Reunion Headquarters), 512-556-2100

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OTHER COX REUNIONS — All Family Lines Welcome


DESCENDANTS OF NATHAN & DORCAS KING COX - COX ARKANSAS REUNION

WHEN: May 4, 2019 (reconvened in 2018)

WHERE: Boonville, Arkansas

LOCATION: Ione Community Building on Hwy 23, ten miles from Boonville, Arkansas CONTACT: Dana Cox, 479-206-1346; [email protected]

Barbara King Miller, 479-646-9489, b[email protected]

OTHER: Bring a covered dish & Cox history.


DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL COX; RHODES-COX REUNION

WHEN: Usually late March/early April, 2019

WHERE: Happy, Texas

LOCATION: Community Center

CONTACTS: *Claude & Freida Cox, 325-748-5221

5580 Hughly Lane, Blanket, Texas 76432-6538

*Linda Cox, 806-622-1631; (c) 806-678-8412 (r) 806-622-1631

13995 Halsey Trail, Amarillo, Texas 79118 [email protected]


DESCENDANTS OF GEORGE W. COX, SR. (SON OF SAMUEL COX & MARTHA (COX) COX)

WHEN: June 9, 2019

WHERE: Belton, Texas

LOCATION: Bell County Sportsman’s Club, 2549 Bell Co. Sportsman Rd, off Hwy 317 N. & FM 2483 West

CONTACTS: Eileen Goldborer, 512-462-2537; [email protected] 7203 Elm Forest Road, Austin, Texas 78745

OTHER: Pot Luck at noon; Bring old photographs


DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL COX / DESCENDANTS OF JOHN MELT COX & SUSIE PATRICK

WHEN: July 20, 2019

WHERE: Whitley City, Kentucky

LOCATION: Senior Citizens Building, McCreary County Park (off Hwy 27) CONTACTS: *Freda Cox Neal, 423-215-5019; [email protected]

P. O. Box 1052, Whitley City, Kentucky 52653

*Cindy Schmidt, 10799 Lewistown Road, Cordova, Maryland 21625-2417

OTHER: Potluck dinner


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DESCENDANTS OF CHRISTOPHER COX & 'NEALY' COX

WHEN: Not held in 2018

WHERE: Sweetwater, Texas (formerly held at Gustine, Texas) CONTACTS: Missy Cox Jones, 325-356-3547; [email protected]

Sadie Cox, 532-332-2768; 1316 Boatright, Odessa Texas 79762


DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL HAMPTON & NICA JANE COX (JOSEPH & SAMUEL)

WHEN: Contact for status and information

WHERE: Nolanville, Texas

CONTACTS: Barbara McClung, 210-274-6889; [email protected] Wesley Cox, 254-285-9557; [email protected]


DESCENDANTS OF EMERSON COX (DESCENDANT OF JOSEPH COX & SOLOMON COX, JR.)

WHEN: Not scheduled for 2019

WHERE: Mertzon, Texas

CONTACTS: Joe Harper, 432-631-6852; [email protected] 1001 Woodland Park Avenue, Midland, Texas 79705


DESCENDANTS OF JOSPEH COX

WHEN: Not schedule for 2019

WHERE: Chillicothe, Missouri

CONTACTS: Meredith Hahn, 816-632-7128; memer[email protected] Mary Ann Nichols, 913-432-0996; [email protected]

Norma Thompson, 913-961-3288; [email protected]


DESCENDANTS OF WM. MADISON TUCKER COX & FANNIE LINDSEY COX*

WHEN: 2020* dates to be determined

WHERE: San Antonio, Texas

LOCATION: Lady Bird Johnson Park, Hwy 16, S.. from Fredericksburg (Tatsch House) CONTACTS: Elden Wagner, 830-570-6688; [email protected]

Lisa Sullivan, 210-275-5167; [email protected] 324 Meadowood Lane, Coppell, Texas 75019-2640

Essay Contest


ENTRY DEADLINE: May 2019

To discover and document more family stories and create more interest in family history amount younger generations, Brandywine is sponsoring an essay contest for young family historians!


SUBJECT: Cox & Related Family

Essays can be based on a specific family member or on families based on information handed down through written or oral histories.


Entries must be typewritten, double spaced with a cover page containing:


Story Title

Your Cox Family Line Your Name

Your Age Parents Names Mailing Address

Telephone Number Email Address


DIVISIONS:

Junior (6th-8th) or 13 yrs & under) (min. 300 words)


Senior (9th-12th) or 14-18 yrs) (min. 500 words)


ELIGIBLITY:

Young family historians whose families are members of Brandywine Crucible, Inc.


ENTRY DEADLINE:

May 1st, 2019


SEND TO:

Missy Cox Jones 205 North Worth

Comanche, Texas 76442-2640

325-356-3547

[email protected]


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Meeting Moment — Vision, Leadership and

The President’s Report


Message from Joe


Brandywine family,

Once again, I’m pleased to say that we had another fine reunion in Lampasas, TX, this past June. There were a number of first-time attendees to participate in an excellent program. This was our first reunion and annual meeting at the Bar17 Event Center, and our group appeared to be very pleased with this location. We will return for our 2019 event. There also appeared to be general satisfaction with our new hotel, a very new Best Western Plus.

Our website remains our top priority at this time. After being down for several months, our current website host, Roots Web, is functioning again, and so is our website. Yea! Web master Mark Werner is heading our project to move our website to another host and to reorganize the material in a more organized and user-friendly manner, as has been agreed to by our board and by the general membership. Family history data base manager Debbie Brewer Cox and a committee representing family lines from Solomon and Naomi will assist as needed.

The board continues to ask family members to write short autobiographies and biographies of their family members whose history they want to preserve. Send to Debbie Brewer Cox for the family history data base, who will forward to webmaster Mark Werner for the web site. In the same vein, we continue to solicit family stories. They don’t have to be fully documented or lengthy; if they are stories passed down from past generations in your family, and thus are a part of your family’s written or oral tradition, we would like to publish them in our newsletter and preserve them on our website. Again, please send them to newsletter editor Debbie, who will forward them to webmaster Mark.

We also want the contact information (names, addresses, email addresses, phone #s) for your family members who are not on our mailing list. That’s how we grow our numbers, and we don’t want to lose track of family lines.

Finally, we welcome two new board members, Marty Burnett of Cherokee, Texas, and Dave Turner of Houston, Texas. Regrettably, we lose two long-time board members, Les Sutton and Bill Langston. Les, as many of you will know, was one of our Brandywine incorporators and founding directors. A long-time family researcher, he documented his research in a data base which he generously allowed to become the Brandywine family history data base and the address data base. Along with our deceased cousin and former director, Mary Lou Hudson Goins, he founded and managed our DNA project until very recently and maintained extensive family history records, now part of the Brandywine collections at the University of Texas Center for American History and the Southwest Collection at Texas Tech. Les will continue to assist with the DNA project as needed and give wise counsel in general. Bill for many years chaired our research committee and was a devoted and accomplished researcher of Cox and related families. Living in Minnesota, he has found it difficult the past few years to attend our annual meetings but will continue to be a source of family research and history. All in our organization extend our sincere thanks to both of these former directors.

We hope to see many of you in Lampasas, Texas, this coming May 31-June 2. We have a great family!

Joe Cox

(H) 512-392-2097 — [email protected]


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PROJECTS &

COMMITTEES


DNA Project


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Please contact Steve or Debbie about DNA testing and information about our project. This is one of our major and most fruitful efforts as an organization. Les Sutton and Mary Lou Hudson originated this project and managed it from inception. The participant/ donor must be a non-adopted m a i l c a r r y i n g t h e C o x surname.


In 2015 the project contained

497 members. As of June 2018 there are 773 members!


PROJECT MANAGERS


Steve Atkins

6325 Broadway Avenue Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73139-7130

[email protected]


Debbie Brewer Cox

708 Creekridge Drive Goodrich, TX 77335

[email protected]

Publications & Ar c h ives This committee reviews books about our Cox and related families as candidates for distribution to some 30 genealogical libraries and organizations around the country. Criteria are listed on our web site. This committee also administers our archival agreements wi th Th e C en ter f or American History at the University of Texas at Austin and t he S out h we st Collection at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas.


These two projects are major parts of our work to record and preserve our family history, including the role our extended family has had in settling the United States, the stories of our family personalities, and the d a y - t o - d a y l i v e s a n d exp eri en ces of ou r ancestors.


If you have or know of a book that you deem worthy of our distribution or have or know of a collection of family history papers that ne e d a home , ple as e

contact Chairman Gary Su t ton or on e of h i s committee members.


Publications & Archives Committee members are as follows:


Gary Sutton, Chair

P.O. Box 897 Melvin, TX 76858-0897 [email protected]

325-286-4005


Ada Stump

P.O. Box 20294 Oklahoma City, OK 73156-0294 [email protected] Ph. 405-751-9475


Thelma Burchfiel 9712 Wariner Circle Oklahoma City, OK 73162-5657

[email protected] Ph. 405-722-9712


Lisa Sullivan

324 Meadowood Lane

Coppell, TX 75019-2640 [email protected] Ph. 210-275-5167


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PROJECTS & COMMITTEES

~ continued


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CemeteryHeadstone/Marker Project


The intent of this project is to encourage and assist families to replace or restore badly deteriorated headstones in order to maintain the identity of graves of our family members.

Contact: Susan Cox

6715 Desco Drive

Dallas, Texas 75225-2704 [email protected]

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Website Update


Some of you may have noticed that Rootsweb, our webhost was down for some length of time this past year. Mark Werner, Webmaster, stated that the site is now up and running!


http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~brandywi/ index.html


MILITARY PROJECT

CON TACT MAR TY BURNET T a t

[email protected] WITH MILITARY PHOTOS FOR THE MILITARY PHOTO ALBUM.


Committees


Budget: Linda Atkins Webmaster: Mark Werner Membership: Lisa Sullivan Newsletter: Debbie B. Cox Hospitality: Helen Cox Counselor: Scott Cox Pub/Archives: Gary Sutton DNA Project: Steve Atkins

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REUNION ACTIVITIES


BRANDYWINE FAMILY GOLF TOURNAMENT


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We would like to bring back our family golf tournament, which at one time attracted great participation but has not been scheduled for the past few years.


The tournament, which was very informal with lots of camaraderie, took place on Friday morning at 9:00 A.M., the first day of our three-day annual meeting and reunion in Lampasas.


Enthusiasm was more important than skill.


If you would like to participate this year (May 31st, 2019), please contact Linda Atkins at [email protected] , p h . 405-549-6588.


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Military Project

Project Leader: Marty Barnet


Military Album Index


Bellknap, Kevin Mark Bowman, Noel Craig Cox, Aaron Lee

Cox, Anthony Allan Cox, Benjamin FLoyd Cox, Bennie Leo Cox, Bennie Wendell Cox, Bobby Lee

Cox, Bobby Lee Cox, Bobby Leo

Cox, Byron William Sr.

Cox, Christopher Columbus Cox, Cornelius Jackson Cox, Crit

Cox, David Pleasant Cox, Delmer D. Cox, Dorris Elvin Cox, Earl

Cox, Edward Darrell Cox, Edward Earl Cox, Eldon Walter Cox, Eugene

Cox, Floyd Lemuel Cox, Fred Donald Cox, Freddy Richard Cox, George Henry Cox, Harvey

Cox, Helen Elaine Cox, Idys Darwin Cox, Jacob W. Cox, Jesse Steven Cox, Joel Melvin

Cox, John Henry Lofton Cox, John William

Cox, Joseph A. Cox, Joseph Albert Cox, Larry James Cox, Leslie William

Cox, Melvin Francis Cox, Morris Dean Cox, Norman Hoyt Cox, Raymond Lowell Cox, Richard Allen Cox, Richard Lee Cox, Richard Lewis Cox, Roger Ray

Cox, Sidney Wallace Cox, Thadrick Shelton Cox, William Donald Cox, William Jesse Cox, William Vernon

Cox, Xenophon ‘XB’ Boone Jr. Derryberry, Lee H.

Farmer, Robert Roy Froelich, William Edward Green, Walter Charles Griggs, John Hillard Griggs, Walter Waylon Hamilton, John

Hamilton, Robert Norman Hell, Patrick

Irwin, Van ALlen Larsen, Bodie Len Lethco, Nelson Mailcoat, Jimmie Allen Maniord, Ronald E. Massey, Andrew Wayne Sherrow, Harold Leroy Stamper, Paul Eugene Storrs, David W. Sutton, Duglas Elmer Tarry, Carl Anthony Tarry, Joe Ellis

Tarry, Thomas Edgar Wellborne, Roque Kyle Wellborne, Walter Leroy


Name: Jacob W. Cox

Birth: 1841 Newton, Missouri, USA

Death: Mansfield, De Soto Parish, Louisiana, USA


Joined 6th Calvary, Ross Brigade, CSA in Dallas County.


Father: Cornelius 'Neely' Cox

Mother: Katherine 'Katy' Jackson


Spouse: Huldah Jane Moore

Marriage: Dec 25 1861 Dallas, Texas, USA

Children: none


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Marty Barnet heads up our Military Project. She maintains a photo album of those who have served and those who are serving in the military.


If you have a Cox ancestor or relative who is serving, please send in their photo with their rank a n d a l i s t o f a n y a w a r d s presented for inclusion in the Military Project.


Email Marty at: [email protected]


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Brandywine Cox Family

Liaisons


Children of Solomon Cox Sr. & Naomi Hussey


THOMAS ISAAC COX


Contact:

MARTHA COX


Contact:

CHRISTOPHER COX


Contact:

Marie Polly

2251 E. Frontier Terrace Mustang, Oklahoma 73064-6242

405-745-5054

[email protected]

Melinda Lambaren

2802 Winchester Court

Stockton, California 95209-2736

209-477-3209

[email protected]

Lisa Sullivan

324 Meadowood Lane

Coppell, Texas 75019-2620

210-275-5167

[email protected]

SOLOMON COX, JR.

STEPHEN COX

NAOMI 'AMY' COX

Contact:

Contact:

Contact:

Melinda Lambaren

Ladean Bowman

Ladean Bowman

2802 Winchester Court

12206 Natchez Park Lane

12206 Natchez Park Lane

Stockton, California 95209-2736

Humble, Texas 77346

Humble, Texas 77346

209-477-3209

281-852-7878

281-852-7878

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

ABSOLOM COX

MARY COX

ANN COX

Contact:

Contact:

Contact:

Ladean Bowman

Ladean Bowman

Ladean Bowman

12206 Natchez Park Lane

12206 Natchez Park Lane

12206 Natchez Park Lane

Humble, Texas 77346

Humble, Texas 77346

Humble, Texas 77346

281-852-7878

281-852-7878

281-852-7878

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

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For more information on the various family lines of Solomon Cox, Sr. & Naomi Hussey, please contact one of the family line liaisons listed above.


Additional information can be found on the Brandywine Cox Family Tree Database at:


Brandywine Cox Family, Descendants of Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey https://lessutton.tribalpages.com

RUTH COX


Contact:

Ladean Bowman

12206 Natchez Park Lane Humble, Texas 77346

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281-852-7878

[email protected]


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Births, Weddings,

Anniversaries, Retirements, Awards, Graduations



Births


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Mattie Marie Cox Born Sept. 8, 2018

3 lbs. 3 oz.

Mattie Marie Cox, daughter of Bryan and Samantha Cox and granddaughter of Tony and Debbie Cox, arrived six weeks early. She spent her first 30 days in NICU but is home now and thriving! She has a proud big brother, Oliver.


Lineage: Mattie Marie Cox > Bryan Everett Cox > Anthony Everett Cox > Thomas Albert Cox > Bertram C. Cox

> Albert C. Cox > Andrew Peace ‘Andy’ Cox > Fleming Trigg Cox > Samuel Cox, Jr. > Martha Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey


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Announcements can be emailed to: [email protected]

Graduation


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2018


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Nathan Albert Cox, High School Graduate, is the son of Anthony E. ‘Tony’ Cox and Debbie Brewer Cox


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Lineage: Nathan Albert Cox > Anthony Everett Cox > Thomas Albert Cox > Bertram C. Cox > Albert C. Cox > Andrew Peace ‘Andy’ Cox > Fleming Trigg Cox > Samuel Cox, Jr. > Martha Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey


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Births, Weddings, Anniversaries, Retirements, Awards, Graduations

~~ continued ~~


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HAPPY 90TH BIRTHDAY NELL SUTTON!


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Nancy Nell Sutton Turner, daughter of Elmer David Sutton and Ettie Overa Nancy Cox, celebrated her 90th Birthday with family and friends in July 2018. She married Edward Houstin Turner in 1947 and together they have four children and n u m e r o u s grandchildren and great grandchildren.


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Births, Weddings, Anniversaries, Retirements, Awards, Graduations

~~ continued ~~


100 th Birthday Celebration



Announcing the marriage of JAMES PATRICK DARBY II to Lauren Elaine Williams on June 9, 2018. James is the son of James Patrick Darby and Deborah Lee Swope Darby.


Lineage:

James Patrick Darby II > Deborah Lee Swope > Alonzo John Swope > Myrtle Alice Cox > Christopher Columbus ‘Alonzo’ Cox > Nica Jane Cox > Joseph Cox > Solomon Cox Jr.

> Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey

MARI E MAX I NE

SWOPE ELMORE celebrated her 100th Birthday in Harlingen, Texas in June of 2018. She was born in Bell County, Texas to Arthur John Swope and Myrtle Alice Cox. She married William Robert Elmore and together they have two children.


Lineage:

Marie Maxine Swope > Myrtle Alice Cox > Christopher Columbus ‘Alonzo’ Cox > Samuel Hampton ‘Sam’ Cox > Fleming Trigg Cox > Samuel Cox, Jr.

> Martha Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey



Announcing the Engagement of Thomas William Cox

and Amanda Hord Treece



Email Announcements to: [email protected]

Thomas is the son of James Leonard Cox & Sharon Aline Sain.


Lineage:

Thomas William Cox > James Leonard Cox

> Byron William Cox > Willie Byron Cox > William Benjamin Cox > Pleasant C. Cox > Solomon Cox > Thomas Isaac Cox >


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Family Memories

CLARK - MOORE FAMILY

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My grandfather, John William Moore, Jr. was born 12Aug1886 and died 20Mar1924 in Lampasas County, Texas. I am not sure where he was born. Probably Lampasas since his family settled there in the mid 1870s. He is buried in Smith Cemetery School Creek, Lampasas County, Texas.


My grandmother, Martha Ann Clark Moore was born 24Oct1891, I suppose on her parent's place (Alexander Greaton "Harry" Clark & Amy Emma Cox Clark). Harry & Amy Emma Cox Clark's place was only a short distance from the Pleasant Cox place. She died on 25Jul1920 from appendicitis at her home in the School Creek Community in Lampasas County, Texas.. She had survived the surgery at Scott & White Hospital, Temple, Texas and was recovering at home. I suppose her death might be related to poor hygiene since doctors have learned so much that was unknown then. She is buried at Smith Cemetery School Creek, Lampasas County, Texas.


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My mother, Robbie Katherine Moore Walton was born 30Jan1913 in Grundyville Texas. The town doesn't exist any more but was near the Rumley community in Lampasas County, Texas. It is not far from the Clark & Cox's place if you travel across a pasture. She died 19Sep2003 in an Arlington, Texas nursing home. Dementia raised it's ugly head in the mid 1990s and I moved her up here to the DFW area of Texas where I have lived most of my adult life. She was able to live with me in my home until 2000, but she started falling and I was no longer physically strong enough to lift her off the floor. She is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lampasas, Texas. She still had a Bible gifted to her by her father Christmas 1923 & we buried it with her. ~~ Pictured at right: Robbie Katherine Moore Walton (1913-2003)


By the time Robbie was eleven years old she had been orphaned by both parents. She and her sister were raised by their paternal maiden aunt, Lula Moore. They also spent quite a bit of time with their Clark grandparents. The Clarks had eleven children and apparently their home was open to any of their grandchildren at any time. Robbie was especially close to the daughters of her uncle, Norah Ervin Clark. His daughters were Iva Rue Clark Jackson, Iona Clark Adams, Mildred Clark Potts, and Veta Faye Clark Haines. In the 1990s, Robbie & Iona decided they wanted to take a trip down memory lane so I took them. We couldn't find the Long Meadows Cox Cemetery because this was in the days before the cemetery had been fenced off and restored.


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Printed with permission.

We did find the Harry and Emma Cox Clark place and the minute we drove up Robbie & Iona (Iona Clark Adams 1908-1999) dissolved into fits of giggles & told this funny story about their Grandpa Clark. When automobiles became commonplace in Lampasas some of his children talked Grandpa Clark into getting one. I believe that one of his sons was also along for this great adventure. Both Robbie & Iona were there for the show that ensued. When he got to the gate going to their house, Grandpa Clark yelled Whoa!!!!! Naturally the car didn't understand & he went crashing through the gate with this new fangled invention. Grandpa Clark refused to ever drive a car again. His words were, "If this dang thing didn't have enough sense to stop when I yelled Whoa I'm not going to have anything to do with it. At least a horse has enough sense to stop"

Source: FLORENCE ANN ‘FLO’ WALTON, 06 June 2018, daughter of Horace Grant Walton and Robbie Katherine Moore

Lineage: Solomon Cox Sr. > Thomas Isaac Cox > Solomon Cox > Pleasant C. Cox > Amy Emma Cox > Martha Ann Clark > Robbie Katherine Moore


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Family Memories ~

continued


John William Moore, Jr. and Martha Ann Clark


I especially would love for someone in the world to know about my grandparents (John William Moore, Jr. and Martha Ann Clark). They were born so long ago and died so young there's probably no one other than my brother (Horace Glen Walton) and myself that knows that they ever existed. I have no children; my brother has three but they do not have an interest in genealogy.


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My mother and her sister (Ima Jean Moore Burns), although orphaned young, did not seem to suffer any deprivation in the material sense. The Moore family was not wealthy by any stretch of the imagination but the girls had a car with a rumble seat when they were teens. They had the rumble seat filled with watermelons they had grown and were on their way to Lampasas to sell them. Like nearly all teenagers, they had a tendency to drive too fast, rolled the car going around a curve, and smashed all the watermelons. The melons were the only thing that suffered any real damage. They took trips to Oklahoma and Arizona to visit relatives and lived a rather comfortable life in so far as possible as orphaned children can.


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My aunt (Ima Jean Moore Burns), eloped at age 16 and had a happy marriage for 60+ years until her death. My mother (Robbie Katherine Moore Walton) attended college at Mary Hardin Baylor College in Belton, Texas Tech in Lubbock and Daniel Baker College in Brownwood, Texas and she taught school at Unity School north of Lampasas & south of Adamsville. While attending college at Daniel Baker College she had a roommate from Moline who just so happened to have a single brother. That is when she met my father Horace Grant Walton. They were married August 30, 1936, and farmed and ranched there in Moline and also bought additional adjoining property. They lived there until his untimely death at age 58 in 1970. Robbie continued to run the ranch until the mid 1990s when she became disabled from dementia. She was one amazing woman. She worked in the fields, kept the house

spotless, always had a large garden, and was a beautiful seamstress who made all my clothes. I had more beautiful clothes than anyone in the county. In one respect it was not to my advantage because it turned me into a clothes horse. After I finished college and started working I spent way too much money on clothes. Now that I'm older I just throw on a pair of jeans and to heck with looking good.


I think it is a bit ironic that the Walton place in Moline was only a couple of miles from the home of Mother's great uncle, Francis Marion Cox. As a child I remember Mr. Cox, his sons, Joe (Joe Berton Cox, Sr.) and John (John Thomas Cox), and Ernest (William Ernest Cox) and his daughter Hattie (Hattie Elsie Cox Sherriff). I knew Ernest best. Every time Ernest saw me, he would laugh and call me "Little Robbie".


I have corresponded with Joe via email & that is how I came to know about Brandywine Crucible.


Printed with permission.

Source: FLORENCE ANN ‘FLO’ WALTON, 06 June 2018, daughter of Horace Grant Walton and Robbie Katherine Moore

Lineage: Solomon Cox Sr. > Thomas Isaac Cox > Solomon Cox > Pleasant C. Cox > Amy Emma Cox > Martha Ann Clark > Robbie Katherine Moore


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Family History


Ancestors of Rachel Carr By Marie Polly, [email protected] January 4, 2018 —reprint—


Good Morning Brandywine family,

We now have some additional information about the ancestors of Rachel Carr. She was the wife of Thomas Carr, and their children were, Benjamin, Solomon, Nathan, and Jehu. I’ve been both interested and fascinated for a lengthy time about this branch of our family, and I have been asked to write about the information that I found and the way that I found it.

Originally, I pursued another opinion that assumed that we connect to the Carr family of Rhode Island. Caleb Carr was a Quaker, and eventually became the Governor of that state. There is printed literature of his descendants, and he did have a son named Nicholas, and Nicholas had a son named Benjamin (actually 2 sons). The first son died and in 1697 another son was named Benjamin and he married a woman named Ann. From this source, it lists no descendants. Another source said that they had 2 girls, so that would end the Carr name for his line.

From Hinshaw’s transcribed Quaker Encyclopedia. We find that our Thomas was from Maryland, his father was Benjamin, he had a sister named Juliatha, and that they had been received at Cane Creek MM in NC. On the marriage certificate, Thomas Carr and Rachel Jones were living in Orange Co. NC. His father is listed as being from Baltimore, and he is deceased.

With this limited information, I began a search in the online digital archives of Maryland. A study of the geographical development of Maryland, it’s early history and the influence of Virginia gave additional important insite into our Carr family.

During the colonial period, there were 2 Carr families. One was John Carr and his wife Petrocella. They had a son, Nicholas. I found no connection with them to our family.

Since Juliatha was our Thomas’s sister, and that name is a very uncommon, I suspected that there was a connection to the Walter and Juliatha Carr family. There are numerous records of Walter Carr on the Maryland archives. The names of 3 of their children are listed in the 1680 will of Thomas Daborne. Juliatha is his executrix and the children that are listed are John, Richard and Susan. It is uncertain if Thomas Daborne was Juliatha’s father, a kinsman, neighbor or a business partner of her husbands. It is also speculated that her father was Richard Gott who came into the Maryland province in 1658 or 59 Page 2 with a daughter named Juliatha. Richard Gott's known family included himself, his wife Susanna and daughters Juliatha and Susanna. Juliatha named one of her sons Richard, and her only daughter Susanna. It does not appear that Walter and Juliatha (Lartha) were Quakers. Their son Thomas was a Quaker and married Elizabeth Price in Baltimore. He was born in Baltimore in 1666 and died there in 1758. Walter and Lartha are mentioned in the 1705 marriage record as parents, but there is no indication that either parent was still alive. None of the family were on the list of people that signed the marriage record. They are also not listed on earlier Quaker records. Walter was listed as a soldier, and was often in court where he would be under oath. Quakers did not fight or swear oaths in court.

Walter Carr JR. was married to Martha. Both Walter Sr. and Walter Jr. died in 1699 and Martha Carr requested letters of administration for both her husband and her father-in-law. The next year she married John Wiley.

“One of the last records of Walter Carr, Sr. was on 7 September 1687, when he sold 100 acres of the 227-acre tract "Beaverdam Branch" to Edward Talbott. His wife may have died before then because there is no record that she released her right of dower to that land. Possibly the last record of her was in 1685, when she was the executrix of Thomas Daborne’s will.” “At the court session dated 8 May 1710, John Wiley and his wife Martha, administratrix of Walter Carr, JR. and administratrix of Walter Carr, SR., his father, were granted a continuance (Abstracts of the Testamentary Proceedings of the Prerogative Court of Maryland, Vol. XII, by V.L. Skinner, 2008, p. 28). At the session dated 1 August 1710, John Carr, BEN Carr, and Susannah Hawkins (alias Susannah Tracy), children of Walter Carr, Sr., petitioned that the balance of his estate be transmitted to Anne Arundel Court. Mentioned in this proceeding was Martha Wiley, widow of Walter Carr, Jr. for his children (ibid., p. 50).”


On 8 Nov. 1709, at the Anne Arundel County Court, the petition of John Whelley was presented. "Petitioner married the widow of Walter Carr, who had four small children. Petitioner has brought them up so that now they are capable of doing something for him, but some ill-minded people have deluded two of them from him and their mother. Petitioner has been ill and asks that his shortcomings as a step-parent be pardoned. Court named a panel of five, and ordered that they or any two of them bind out the two children mentioned, provided John Whelley does not clothe them and do everything for their maintenance that the law directs" ("Orphans Cases in Anne Arundel County Court, Page 3 Maryland Judgment Record TB 2, November 1708-June 1712," Transcribed by Doug Hayman, Anne Arundel Readings, Vol. 7, no. 2, July 2004, p. 22”

From the three paragraphs in parenthesis just quoted, I am assuming that the children mentioned in 1710 were the children of Walter Sr. (John, Ben, and Susan) because we know that Walter and Juliatha had children named John and Susan, so Ben would be their younger brother which would perhaps have been born by 1685.

In 1650, Thomas Carr, son of Benjamin acknowledged that he wanted to a part of the Friends at the Baltimore Meeting. There are no records that I can find that either John, Susan, or Benjamin were Quakers. Our Thomas’s connection appears to be with Thomas and Elizabeth Carr, before Thomas died in 1758.

Additional information:

John Carr, son of Walter Carr Sr. died in Baltimore in 1739 November 1716, Benjamin purchased land from Thomas Hooker Susanne’s first two husbands died and she married Augustine Hawkins. They had 5 children, and 4 of the births of their children are recorded in the register of St. James Parish which was located in Herring Creek Hundred, Anne Arundel Co. MD It is speculated that Richard died in 1699. He was not married and did not have any children.


Since this is lengthy, I will add more at a later date.

Best Wishes Marie Polly [email protected]

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Family History ~ continued


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Family History ~ continued



https://www.geni.com/people/Sir-John-Hussey-1st-Baron-Hussey-of-Sleaford/6000000001744948486


SIR JOHN HUSSEY (1466-1536)


This is the ancestor beheaded for not bringing his tenants to fight for Henry VIII.

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Baron of Sleaford.


In 1521 he was made Chief Butler of England. He was signatory to document sent f rom England begging papal approval for Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine. Gave evidence at the trial of her previous marriage with Prince Arthur. Appointed Chamberlain to illigitimized 'Princess' Mary and at this time his allegiance to her father began to waver.


John Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford From Wikipedia


Born 1465/1466

Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England Died 1536[1]/1537[2]

Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England Spouse(s) Margaret Blount Anne de Grey

Relations Son of William Hussey Son-in-law of George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent

Brother-in-law of Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Kent

Brother-in-law of William Willoughby, 11th Baron Willoughby de Eresby

Children William (Sir Knight), Thomas, Giles (Sir), Elizabeth, Bridget, Anne, Dorothy, Mary, William

Residence Sleaford

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Occupation Chief Butler of England


John Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford (1465/1466 - 1536/1537) (sometimes 'Huse') was Chief Butler of England from 1521 until his death. [3] He was a member of the House of Lords, and a Chamberlain to King Henry VIII's daughter, Mary I of England.


Hussey was born in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England, son of William Hussey, an English judge and Chief Justice of the King's Bench. His mother was the former Elizabeth Berkeley. Hussey' s siblings included: Elizabeth, who married Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Kent, and Mary Hussey, who married William Willoughby, 11th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.


In 1497, at the Battle of Blackheath, Hussey was knighted. Six years later, he was made 'Knight of the Body', bodyguard to King Henry VII, followed by an appointment as 'Master of Lyfield Forest', Rutland in 1505 and Comptroller of the Household in 1509. On 16 August 1513, he was promoted to Knight banneret.


In 1493 Hussey was appointed Sheriff of Lincolnshire and by 1513 he was custos rotulorum for the county. On 6 July 1523, he was elected Member of Parliament as a knight of the shire for Lincolnshire. Three years later, 5 February 1526, he was appointed a judge. On 3 November 1529 he was re-elected to Parliament as knight of the shire for Lincolnshire but received a Writs of Summons on 1 December 1529 to the House of Lords as 'Johannes Hussey de sleford, chivaler'. In June 1 5 3 0 , H u s s e y w a s n a m e d Lincolnshire Castle's Commissioner for Gaol Delivery, and later that same year, Hussey sold some of his large holdings (the Somersetshire manors of Batheaston, Bathampton, Bathford, Twerton; the Wiltshire manors of Compton Bassett, Comerwell, and North Wraxall.


On the 10th September 1533, Lord Hussey attended the christening of

princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth 1), daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, and carried the canopy over the 3-day old child with George Boleyn, Viscount Rochford, Lord Thomas Howard, and William Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Effingham.


Hussey was Chamberlain to King Henry's daughter, Mary, while Hussey's second wife, Lady Anne, was one of Mary's attendants. Though King Henry forbade anyone from calling his daughter, Mary, by the title of Princess, Lady Anne did do so, after which she lost her attendant position around June 1534 and was imprisoned in the Tower of London in August. Asking for the King's pardon, she was released before the end of the year.


In addition to his responsibilities at Court and Parliament, Hussey was steward to John Longland, the conservative Bishop of Lincoln, and King Henry's confessor.


Hussey was implicated along with his cousin as complicit in the 1536 uprising known as the Pilgrimage of Grace. Though Hussey denied participation in the rebellion, he was accused of conspiring to change laws and depose the king, and that he abetted those who made war on the king in October 1536. The charges may have been levied in part because of Hussey's Catholic sympathies, and because Hussey and his wife, having served 'Princess' Mary, were partisans on her behalf. Hussey was indicted and tried for treason, and found guilty by the House of Lords. He was beheaded in Lincoln in 1536, while his cousin, Thomas Darcy, was executed on Tower Hill.


Hussey's statement ('confession') survives.

~~~~~~

Beheaded for not bringing his tenants to fight for King Henry VIII. Cromwell offered him a pardon if he would furnish particulars. He refused. ??


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Family Stories



Memories of my Grandfather Nicholas Cornelius ‘Nick’ Cox October 2018

by Marvalene ‘Missy’ Cox Jones


Maybe I have not titled this story right, because my grandfather Nick Cox died in 1929 and I was born in 1930. However, his life is very familiar to me, and my Daddy, William Cornelius ‘Will’ Cox and my Mother, Minnie Steward Cox talked about him and the family a lot. Grandpa Nick was born in 1850 in Smith County, East Texas, and was married to Mary Jane Johnson on April 19, 1975 in Comanche County.

I was born in 1930, and I had an older brother, Cornelius Wilburn Cox who was born in 1915. My Mother and Daddy had married in 1912. I also had an older sister, Geneva Cox Mercer and she was born in 1919.

My brother Wilburn talked a lot about being with Grandpa Cox. My family, my daddy, mother and Wilburn and Geneva moved to West Texas to farm about 1924. So my brother had many memories of Grandpa Cox.

Wilburn said that Grandpa Cox told him this story. He said that he and Catherine, his sister, were riding horseback one day. They had some horses that had gotten out and they were looking for them. He said the Indians got after them. He said that Catherine was riding a really good horse, but that she was afraid to make it ‘really run’.

Grandpa Cox told Wilburn, and these are his exact words! “I dropped back, quirted her horse on the rump and we were able to outrun the Indians.”

I have been over the country where they were at. I have studied family stores and stories of other people that have talked about this time in the history of Comanche County. We are all descended from strong people. Just imagine knowing that any minute that the Indians might attack. I have read stories about frontier mothers who would not let their children play outside on bright moonlight nights, because that was known as raiding time by the Indians.


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Pioneers, Lives forged in Hardship

Carving out a place from nothing to make a home.

Filling the Kerosene Lamps

October 2018

by Marvalene ‘Missy’ Cox Jones


When I was a pretty small girl, probably six or seven years old, we lived on Grandpa Cox’s plat, off of County Road 330 going toward Gustine. This was in the late 1930’s or early 1940’s.

We did not have electricity, and used Kerosene Lamps. We called this COAL OIL. Anyway, Daddy had an oil can about 24 inches tall that the coal oil was in. He would take the can to Comanche to have it refilled. There was a round screw off lid on top of the can, and a little spout on the top of the can for filling the lamp.

I did this outside, on the back door doorstep. The doorstep was several flat rocks, and they were at the back door on the west side of our house.

I would take off the lamp globe, wash it good, rinse it and dry it with a kitchen dish towel. It was pretty thin glass and I had to be very careful with it, or it would break.

Now the wick was about an inch wide, and maybe 12 inches long. The wick looked almost like a piece of crochet, and was heavy white string knitted together. This was put into the top of the lamp, and the bottom of the wick would be down in the coal oil. It would ‘wick’ up the coal oil into the wick, in other words, the wick would draw up the coal oil and be wet with the coal oil and you would light this u to light the lamp.

I used Mama’s scissors to trim the wick. It had to be trimmed straight across, and then I trimmed across the ends just a little bit. If it wasn’t trimmed right, when you lighted the wick, it would burn crooked, and there would be a big black smudge of smoke on the globe, and you would have to wash the globe all over again.

I thought I was pretty grown up to be able to help my Mama this way.

By the way, n the movies, when they light the lamp, the whole room lights up. That is not the way it was. The lamp just gave off about 36 inches, or three fee of light. When Maxine and I were getting our lessons at the dining room table, we had the coal oil lamp on the table and that was out lights. Mama would walk by, pick up the lamp, take it over to the kitchen stove to see how supper was looking, and then put it back on our table.

Maxine told me, “no wonder we all wear glasses.” We lived in the dark and studied pretty well in the dark.”


Marvalene ‘Missy’ Cox Jones

Comanche Historical Museum, 402 Moorman Road, Comanche, Texas 76442; Box 22, Comanche, Texas 76442.; Open Wednesday thru Saturday, 10am-4pm.


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From our Young Historians


Journeys of the Cox Brothers

October 2018

submitted by: Marvalene ‘Missy’ Cox Jones


This story is about the “Journeys of the Cox Brothers”, written by my granddaughter, Marki, daughter of my son Mark and his wife Laurie. Marki was ten years old when she wrote this.

Marki has always been better on the computer that I ever was. I gave her some of the dates, etc. of this story, but the bones of the story are all hers.

For instance, she asked me about washing the clothes while they were traveling on the trail in the wagon train. She asked me if the girls would have helped their mother wash clothes.

I had never thought about that before. But, of course, the Cox girls would have helped their mother wash the clothes.

And, the Journeys of the Cox brothers, of course, refers back to the first trip they took, which was traveling from Missouri to Texas in the wagon train.

And the second trip they took was joining up with the Confederate army.

~~ Marvalene ‘Missy’ Cox Jones

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Journeys of the Cox Brothers

by Marki Jones Daughter of Mark and Lauri Jones,

Granddaughter of Marvalene ‘Missy’ Cox Jones


And, the eldest son in the family was Andrew J. Cox, and he is my great grandfather, the father of Cornelius Nicholas ‘Nick’ my grandfather, and William Marion Cox, Catherine Cox and Amanda Cox.

The boys were: Andrew J. Cox (the oldest son), George Henry Cox, Cornelius Jackson Cox. Andrew, George Henry and Cornelius ‘Jack’ all rode 90 miles from Dallas to McKinney Texas to join up with the 6th Texas Calvary, Col. B. Warren Stone. This was on September 21, 1862.

(When they joined up, ‘Jack’ was only 15 years old, being born in 1847) I have copies of their muster in records. They valued their horses and their guns. They were in a bunch of battles, like the battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas and others. (And I have all of the battle records for each Cox boy who served in the Confederacy battles).

I have a book about the battle of ‘PEA RIDGE, Arkansas. It is telling the story of this battle between the Confederates and the Yankees, and when it tells about ‘The confederates came sweeping across the wheat field’, hey his is about our family. Missy Jones

Christopher C. Cox and Harvey Cox enlisted int he 19th Texas Calvary, Burford’s regiment in Dallas county on March 21, 1862. I have copies of their muster in records.

Jacob W. Cox enlisted in the 18th Texas Cavalry, Darnell’s Regiment in Dallas County on March 15, 1862. I have copies of his muster in record. He was killed at the battle of Mansfield, Louisiana on April 8th, 1864.

And Andrew and the rest of the boys all made it home alive, all except Jacob. Joseph didn’t serve in the Confederacy.

When they made the trip to Texas, Andrew, the oldest son, was 23 years old. Joseph was 20 years old, Harvey was 17 years old, Christopher was 9 years old, George Henry was 7 years old, Jacob was 4 years old and Jack was a baby of 1 year old.

The family and the wagon train came to Dallas in 1845. There was very few log cabins in Dallas at that time.

I have a record of where Andrew J. Cox paid his poll tax in Texas, and it was The Republic of Texas at that time.

Cornelius ‘Neely’, Pa took up land through the Peters Colony. They had 640 acres, and a part of it bordered the Trinity River.


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Family History Inquiries


DO YOU HAVE A QUESTION?

If you have a question about your family lines or any family line, feel free to submit your questions for publication in our newsletter. You never know, someone may have all the answers you are looking for!!


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Just email me at: [email protected] with your questions or comments


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STEPHEN A. COX (1804-1852) & REBECCA MAHAN (1813-1852)


I am trying to find the parents of Stephen

  1. Cox’s wife, Rebecca Mahan.


    Stephen and Rebecca were married in Whitley County, Kentucky on January 7th, 1830.


    Apparently, there are two Rebecca Mahan’s and some confusion as to which one married Stephen. I am trying to find a s o u r c e t o p r o v e m y R e b e c c a ’ s parentage.


    I f you can provide me with any information please contact me at:


    Jane Cox Willis [email protected]


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    My lineage:



    Mary Ganevera `Pollie` Leigh Cox 1816 - 1907

    Mary was the wife of Fleming Trigg Cox (1811-1890). I am looking for any additional information or photographs anyone may have on her and her parentage.


    P l e a s e c o n t a c t m e a t : [email protected]

    Solomon Cox (1738-1820)

    & Naomi Hussey Stephen Cox (1779-1850)

    & Mary Margaret Robertson Stephen A. Cox (1809-abt. 1860)

    & Rebecca Mahan Jesse James Cox (1833-1913)

    & Rebecca Addelade Hickman John Robert Cox (1861-1933)

    & Catherine Jane Booher Charles Henry Cox (1903-1993)

    & Loretta Clara Reinecke Jane Cox Willis


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    Brandywine Crucible, Inc.

    ~~ Fun Stuff ~~


    FAMILY HISTORY WORD SEARCH

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    AUNT BRANDYWINE BROTHER COUSINS CRUCIBLE DISCOVERIES

    DNA FAMILY FATHER GATHERING GENERATIONS GRANDPARENT GRAVEYARD HEADSTONE HOMESTEAD

    MOTHER REUNION SEARCH SISTER UNCLE

    REUNION 2018 ATTENDEE SURNAMES :-)


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    BURNETT COX DOWNING FITZGERALD GEE GILMORE HOUY HUMPHRIES JENKINS JOHANSON JOHNSON KIDD KOHUTEK

    LINDSEY NEAL ROBERTSON SCHOPPE STANSELL STUMP SULLIVAN SUTTON TATUM THOMPSON TURNER WILLIAMS


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    Autobiographies & Biographies



    T h e B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s encourages all descendants of Solomon and Naomi Hussey Cox and related families to develop short biographies for Brandywine.


    This is a way of documenting who we are and preserving the story of our lives for future generations. A one-page bio will suffice, telling the family what we should know about you, although longer ones will be fine. We will post on our web site and perhaps at some time publish in book form all of our biographies, so please indicate with your submission your willingness to have your biography posted and published. You can also do a biography for your parents, grandparents, favorite uncles and aunts, etc. We do hope that all of you will agree to share on behalf of our family posterity.


    Please forward biographies to Debbie Brewer Cox, email: [email protected]

    or 708 Creekridge Dr., Goodrich, TX 77335,


    She will record information in our data base as appropriate and then forward to our webmaster.

    LIFE AND TIMES WITH HORACE COX


    August 18, 1898, I was born to William and Nanny Cox. There were five older sisters already and we lived on a farm about a mile west of Nolanville. The west side of that farm is now Harker Heights. It came back across Nolan Creek and Highway 190. Highway 190 now splits it half, in two. As this family grew, I had three more sisters, making a total of eight, and the house and farm had to grow. But as time went on, three of the older sisters married, and left the family. Later World War I broke out. About that time, I met and fell in love with a wonderful young lady. The war finally came to an end. Some of those younger sisters finished their education, and with my father and mother moved into Belton. We stayed out on the farm. Not long after the war, the young lady I fell in love with, and I got married on January 4, 1920. We moved out on the farm, and we stayed there for several years. We had two sons, and before they had gotten very old, we decided to leave the farm and move to St. Rita, New Mexico, a mining town. We stayed there for four or five years. The water there did not agree with me, and the doctor told me if I wanted to live, I would have to leave. We came back to Bell County. We moved out on a little ranch north of Belton and soon had another son. We had three boys and one daughter. We didn't stay there very long and went back to our old home place. That was some of the very hard years for our family on the farm. In all we had three girls and five boys. We lost one daughter to Leukemia. We made it through the rough years until the older boys went to serve with Uncle Sam. The older daughter went to school and that left two sons and two daughters. We raised seven children. We decided to move to Houston, and we stayed down there about twenty-five or thirty years. I was a Fuller Brush Salesman. We stayed there until we left and went out to a place called Sweet Home. There we took care of, an elderly man who some woman had gotten hold of and was about to get everything he had. Later, we went to San Antonio to a home where we stayed with a rich lady and took care of her bulldog. She had show dogs. My wife kind of had to take care of her. She was a wonderful lady, and has passed on now. We moved from San Antonio to a home on North Beal in Belton and stayed there for two or three years, and then moved out to the country about nine miles out of town on a two-hundred acre cattle farm. We stayed there for 15 or 16 years. We moved from the cattle farm to 730 Mitchell Street. It was at this place that my wife passed away on – March 12, 1995 I am still living in this same place.

    ~~ Horace Cox; 1996


    Lineage: Horace William Cox > William Marion Cox > Samuel Hampton Cox > Fleming Trigg Cox > Samuel Cox Jr. > Martha Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Husssey


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    Family Recipes



    Sunset’s King Corn Summer Salad

    “ Corn and Tomato Salad”

    ½ cup chopped red onion 1 tbs olive oil

    4 cups fresh corn kernels

    1. cups cherry tomatoes – rinsed, stemmed, and halved

      ¼ cup slivered fresh basil leaves

    2. tbs sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

    2 oz fresh chevre (goat) cheese, crumbled Directions:

    1. In 10 to 12-inch frying pan over medium- high heat, stir onion in olive oil until limp, 5 to 7 minutes. Add corn and stir often just until tender to bite, 5 to 6 minutes.

    2. Pour mixture into wide serving bowl stir in tomatoes, basil and vinegar Add salt and pepper to taste.

    3. Sprinkle goat cheese over salad; serve warm or at room temperature.

    You can make this salad (through step 2) up to 4 hours ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature to serve. Sprinkle with cheese just before serving. Makes 4 to 6 servings.

    This is one of my favorite summer salads which may have originated in Olathe, Kansas, a small hometown of our Koehler relatives. A total winner!!

    Submitted by: Jane Cox Willis


    Submit your family recipes to: [email protected]

    Be sure to include your name and lineage.

    TEXAS BUTTERMILK SHEET CAKE


    Cake:

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    2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups sugar

    1/2 cup oil 1 cup water 1stick buter 2 eggs

    2 tsp vanilla

    1 tsp cinnamon

    1 1/2 tsp baking soda


    Frosting: 6 T butter

    1 cup light brown sugar, packed 1/2 cup milk

    4-5 cups powdered sugar


    Instructions: CAKE:


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Research Links


The Hussey Millennium — Manuscript Section Index


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HusseyMs.001 HusseyMs.003 HusseyMs.005 HusseyMs.006 HusseyMs.008 HusseyMs.010 HusseyMs.012 HusseyMs.014 HusseyMs.017 HusseyMs.018 HusseyMs.020 HusseyMs.034 HusseyMs.036 HusseyMs.038 HusseyMs.040 HusseyMs.042 HusseyMs.044 HusseyMs.046 HusseyMs.048 HusseyMs.050 HusseyMs.052 HusseyMs.054 HusseyMs.056 HusseyMs.058 HusseyMs.060 HusseyMs.066 HusseyMs.068 HusseyMs.070 HusseyMs.072 HusseyMs.074 HusseyMs.076 HusseyMs.098 HusseyMs.100 HusseyMs.102 HusseyMs.108


.001 Introduction

.003 John Hussey, son of William

  1. Walter Hussey

  2. Walter Hussey continued

.008 Hugh Hussey

.010 John Hussey/Christopher/ Stephen Bachiler

.012 Pricilla Hussey

.014 Lydia Hussey

  1. Bachelor Hussey, son of Sylvanius

  2. Bachelor Hussey, son of Stephen

.020 Ebenezer Hussey

.034 Christopher Hussey

.036 Stephen Hussey, son of Christopher

.038 Stephen Hussey

.040 Naomi Hussey, wife of Solomon Cox

.042 Andrew Peace Cox

.044 Mary Cox Lyle

.046 Isom J. Cox

.048 Christopher Hussey

.050 Thomas Calvin Drennan

.052 Cornelius “Jack” Cox

.054 Thomas Cox

.056 Amy Smart

.058 Amy Smart

.060 Pleasant Cox

.066 James Christopher Cox

.068 Mary E. Cox daughter of James Christopher

.070 Ora Ethel Cox

.072 Arlee Gowen

.076 Jehu Cox, son of Thomas

.098 Richard Hussey

.100 Daniel Hussey’s children

.102 Daniel Hussey

.108 Miscellaneous Hussey’s from South Carolina


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Genealogical Research Sites: fold3.org

ancestry.com Find-a-Grave.com www.dar.org


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Other Research Links:


The Cox Family in America: https://archive.org/stream/ coxfamilyinamer00coxgoog/ coxfamilyinamer00coxgoog_djvu.txt


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http://freepages.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf/genealogy/husseyms.htm


TEXAS ARCHIVAL RESOURCES ONLINE


The secondary depository Brandywine Crucible, Inc. is using to store documents and photographs is Southwest Collection at Texas Tech.:


Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library


15th & Detroit, Box 41041, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1041


http://swco.ttu.edu/

A GUIDE TO THE COX

FAMILY PAPERS, image 1684-2005, [CA.2010]


Les Sutton is a genealogist from Houston, Texas. He is the son of Ettie Overa Nancy Cox and Elmer David Sutton and he has conducted extensive research on the history of the Cox and Sutton families.


This collection consists of Les Sutton’s genealogical research and correspondence files, 1 9 9 5 - 2 0 0 5 , [ c a . 2 0 1 0 ] ,

documenting the history of the Cox family and related families. Correspondence with other genealogists and associated research forms the bulk of the collection. Research material in

the collection include pedigree charts, family group sheets, and biographical information. The files also contain photocopies and transcriptions of original documents dating from 1684 to the twentieth century, including wills, censuses, lad deeds, marriage certificates, obituaries, n e w s p a p e r a r t i c l e s , a n d photographs.

A complete digital inventory of the collection is available upon request.


This collection forms part of the Brandywine Crucible, Inc. records.

A portion of these papers is stored offsite at the Library Storage Facility. Please contact the repository in advance for retrieval.


The offsite material is arranged in the original order established by Les Sutton. Folders and their contents are organized in chronological order from pre-1995-2005, from the back to front of each box.


https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/ taro / u tcah/ 0 1 2 1 2 / 0 1 2 1 2 - P.html



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RELATED MATERIAL


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Cox, Stanley M., and Gary L. Sutton. Joseph Cox: Ancestors and Descendants. Kansas City, Mo.: S.M. Cox, 1975. Call number TXC-ZZ CS 71 C877 1975.

Sutton, Les. We Are the Branches: A Book about the Elmer and Ettie Sutton Family. Houston, TX: Les Sutton, 1996. Call number TXC-ZZ CS 71 S967 1997.

Cox, Mike. Texas Disasters: True Stories of Tragedy and Survival. Guilford, Conn.: Insiders’ Guide, 2006. Call number TXC-Z F386.6 C69 2006.

Additional materials relating to X.B. Cox are housed at the West Texas Collection archives at Angelo State University.


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Lampasas County History


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LINKS TO LAMPASAS, TEXAS:


New Venue for Brandywine Cox Reunion

Bar17 Event Center, 402 S. Live Oak St.

Lampasas, Texas


http://www.texasescapes.com/TOWNS/Lampasas/lampasas.htm


http://www.lampasaschamber.org/


https://www.facebook.com/Lampasas-County-Historical-Commission-766315850130889/


LAMPASAS, TEXAS

Lampasas County Seat, Texas Hill Country 31°3'57"N 98°11'0"W (31.065868, -98.183444)

Hwy 183 & Hwy 281

69 miles NW of Austin on Hwy 183


Lampasas County History


(from 1936 Texas Centennial Marker) LAMPASAS COUNTY

Formed from Travis and Bell counties; Created February 1, 1856; organized March 10, 1856;


The name Lampazos, first given to the river by the Spaniards, was suggested by the many cockle-burs in the region. First settlements about 1850; First railroad, 1882; County seat, Burleson, after 1856, called Lampasas.


http://www.texasescapes.com/Counties/Lampasas-County-Texas.htm


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Family Cemetery History


Lampasas County’s Longmeadow Cemetery


by Mike Cox

A thunderstorm growing darker by the minute hungrily sucked moisture-rich air from the south, the resulting strong wind shaking the blue cloth tied around the state historical marker folks had come to dedicate at Lampasas County’s Longmeadow Cemetery.

His gray straw cowboy hat seated solidly on his head, 88- year-old Arlee Claud Gowen stood before an assemblage of relatives and a few guests with his back facing the soon-to-be-unveiled metal marker. Clutching a yellow-tipped microphone in one hand and the text of his remarks in the other, he put things into perspective.

“When Abraham Lincoln spoke at Gettysburg, he referred to the area as hallowed ground,” the long-time Lubbock resident began. “Lincoln referred to the nation as then having ‘four score and seven years.’ The tenure of this cemetery is now ‘ten score and 18 years.’ Its longevity exceeds that of the United States by 17 years.”

A former newspaper reporter-printer and decorated World War IIveteran, Gowen ranks as dean of a group of tenancious genealogists belonging to a branch of the Cox family (no relation) that has traced its Texas roots deeper than even the most water- starved mesquite. Many of their forebears are buried in this small rural cemetery, a fenced graveyard accessible only by an unpaved private road. In Lampasasfor their annual reunion, members of the Brandywine Crucible – an organization of people named Cox and various other surnames – attended the marker dedication May 21.

While its exact location is unknown, the first burial in or near this cemetery 8 miles east of Lampasas occurred in 1793. And it may well be the oldest Anglo burial in Texas.

Only a decade after the Revolutionary War, a party of American mustangers led by Virginia-born Thomas Isaac Cox came to the vast plains of Spanish Texas hunting wild horses. They encountered an Indian war party and succeeded in repulsing them, but Cox’s nephew, 16-year-old William Charles Bybee, caught an arrow in his chest. Someone broke the feathered shaft and extracted the arrowhead, but everyone must have known the teenager wouldn’t make it.

After suffering through the night, begging for water, Bybee died the following morning. It was his 17th birthday – July 4, 1793.

“His companions dug his grave at the foot of a large postoak tree and wrapped his body in his blanket,” Gowen continued. “They carried large limestone slates from the fence surrounding the immense horsetrap nearby and placed them on top of his grave.”

The youth’s grandfather, James Christopher Cox, chopped three diagonal slashes on the tree to mark the grave.

Gowen said he had interviewed Joe Burton Cox, Sr., who grew up on the ranch surrounding the cemetery, before his death.

“He…recalled seeing this tree with its three slashes when he was a boy,” Gowen said. “Later he wrote a history of this


cemetery and mentioned 37 burials here.”

A story connected to the last person buried in Longmeadow Cemetery circles around its long-ago first burial.

Martha Jane Bybee married Pleasant C. Cox, who in 1856 came to Texas to homestead on the land where William Bybee, her father’s brother, had been buried the previous century. When he learned she would be going to Texas with her new husband to settle where her relatives had trapped horses in the 1700s, her father asked her to find and care for Bybee’s grave. She did that, planted flowers, and kept those flowers and their successors watered until her own death 56 years later.

On a bitterly cold day in Feburary 1912, her family buried her in the cemetery. Ten years later, the Coxes sold the ranch and the cemetery became overgrown.

One of Martha Jane’s sons, John Thomas Cox, later rode as a Texas Ranger. According to family lore, he once observed that the old cemetery held the remains of citizens of six different nations.

“Burials were made under the flag of Spain until 1799, the tricolor of France until 1803, the flag of Mexico until 1836, the flag of the Republic of Texas until 1845, the flag of the Confederate States of America until 1865 and the Stars and Stripes of the United States until the present,” Gowen said.

The youngest occupant of the cemetery is Joseph “Buck” Cox, a brother of the ranger who first pointed out the multi-national aspect of the family plot. Not quite four, Buck died on May 5, 1872. “His death came as a result of a concussion received by

butting his head against a wall in a temper tantrum,” Gowen said.

Of the known burials in the cemetery, only a hanful are marked by headstones. In 2001, the Coxes got Dr. John Dunbar, a Baylor University geologist, to survey the cemetery with ground- penetrating radar. He located 21 other likely graves, now marked by stakes.

Among the known but unmarked graves are those of Charlie Boyd, a cowboy who rode for the legendary cattleman “Shanghai” Pierce, and another waddy known only as “Stumpy” Watson. According to Gowen, on Dec. 10, 1874, the two men got into a row that escalated into a gunfight. When the blackpowder smoke cleared, both lay mortally wounded.

Folks carried them to the Cox house, where Martha Jane nursed them for a week and a half. Despite her best efforts, Boyd died at sunrise on December 22.

“When she told ‘Stumpy’ that Charlie had died,” Gowen said, “he replied, ‘Good, now I can die in peace.’” And that’s just what he proceeded to do.


© Mike Cox - "Texas Tales" May 26, 2011 column


A popular professional speaker, Cox is available to talk to associations, chambers of commerce and other groups about Texas history and other topics.

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http://www.texasescapes.com/MikeCoxTexasTales/Lampasas- County-Longmeadow-Cemetery.htm



Photo by: Donna Cox Beveridge

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Photo by Peggy Smith Wolfe



Photo by Peggy Smith Wolfe


Photo by Peggy Smith Wolfe



Photo by Peggy Smith Wolfe


Long Meadow-Cox Cemetery


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https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2335388/long-meadows-cox- cemetery

Photo by Peggy Smith Wolfe

The Cox Cemetery is located 5 ½ miles northeast of Lampasas, on CR 3, near Lucy Creek. The property on which the cemetery is located is owned by Harold Harton. The cemetery is fenced. Some graves are marked with field stones.


http://www.usavtx.org/id16.html


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Source: Lampasas County Historical Commission "Historic Sites & Places of Lampasas County"



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Brandywine

In Remembrance

*Please note full obituaries can also be viewed on the Brandywine Database


Obituary Index:

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1) Dr. Joseph A. Cox (1925-2018)

  1. Jacqueline Yyvone French Henson (1927-2018)

  2. Duryl Middleton (Gibby) Bailey (1935-2017)

  3. Maybelle ‘Bonnie’ Bonner Gowen (1925-2017)

  4. Joe Edward Cox (1950-2018)

  5. Robert Schuler ‘Roy’ Cox Jr. (1944-2018)

  6. Pauline Ann ‘Polly’ Corbett (1935-2018)

  7. Carl Evans Bochow (1928-2017)

  8. Polly Ann Corbett (1935-2018)

  9. Daniel Dean Cox (1949-2018)


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DR. JOSEPH A. COX, a

longtime resident of Los Baños passed away on January 22, 2018 in Chowchilla, California, at the age of 92 years old.


He was born October 14, 1925 in Arkansas; the son of Melvin and Viola Cox, Joe was the third child and first son of 9 children.


A War vet, Joe served on the

U.S.S. Orion and U.S.S Batfish submarine during WWII, as well as in the Korean War.


Joe is preceded in death by his parents Melvin Virgil and Viola Cox, his siblings Hazel, Anna, Samuel, Virgie, James, and Julia, his wife of 37 years, Mary Gomes, and his first son, Joseph Albert Jr.


Joe is survived by his siblings George and Lucille, his daughter, Joan Marie, his son, Joel Anthony, his grandchildren Adrian, Justine, and Drew and many family and friends.


A visitation will be held on Friday, February 2, 2018 at 8:30 am at Whitehurst Funeral Chapel of Los Banos. The recitation of the Holy Rosary at St. Joseph's Catholic Church of Los Banos on Friday, February 2, 2018 at 10:00 am followed by the Funeral Mass at 10:30 am. Burial at the Los Banos Cemetery District.


~For the complete obituary please see Dr. Joesph’s profile on the Brandywine Cox Family Database


Find-a-Grave #186996396 Lineage:

Dr. Joseph A. Cox > Melvin Virgil Cox > Jehu TIlman Cox > Joseph King Cox > Nathan Cox >Thomas Isaac Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey

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Jacqueline Yyvone French Henson, 90, of Booneville passed from this life March 22, 2018. She was born

Dec. 12, 1927, near Booneville to Lester and Mercedes French. Jacqueline was a homemaker and a member of Washburn Church of Christ. She was preceded in death by her husband, James Ray Henson; sisters, Violet French,

Shirley Epperson and Opal Johnston; and brother,

Glen French.


Funeral service will be 1 p.m. Saturday at Washburn Church of Christ with burial following at French Prairie Cemetery in Ione under the direction of Roberts Funeral Home in Booneville.


She is survived by her son, Les Henson and wife Deborah of Booneville; daughter, Lori Cooper of Somerset, Calif.; nine grandchildren; 10 great- grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.


Pallbearers will be Bill French, Don Trammell, Jeremy Henson, Keith Carney, Les Henson and Joe Evans.


Find-a-Grave #188380029 Lineage:

Jacqueline Yyvonne French > Mercedes Itaska Cox

>Francis Marion Cox >Joseph King Cox > Nathan Cox > Thomas Isaac Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey


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Funeral services for DURYL MIDDLETON (GIBBY) BAILEY, 82, of Belton will be 11 AM October 19, 2017 at Dossman Funeral Home with Scott Neal officiating. Burial will follow at Pleasant Hill Cemetery. He was born January 2, 1935 in Belton, TX to Ardian Leonald Bailey and Pauline Justice Bailey. He completed his elementary school education at Nolanville, and graduated from Belton High School in 1953. While in High School, he was a member of the National Honor Society, and received three letters in football, baseball and track, and in his senior year in high school he was a unanimous selection all-district running back.


He attended Southwest Texas State College from Sept 1953 thru August 1955, and attended The University of Texas at Austin from Sept 1955 thru January 1958 when he was awarded a degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. He received a Master of Science in Civil Engineering from The University of Texas at Austin in May of 1962. As an undergraduate at The University of Texas, he was initiated into Tau Beta Pi, a scholastic honorary engineering society, and into Chi Epsilon, a Civil Engineering Honorary Society. In the fall of 1957 he served as

president of the Student Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He did additional graduate work in Civil Engineering at the University of Florida from September 1962 through April 1965.


He is member of the Sons of the American Revolution and his ancestor, Lt. James Sutton fought in the Revolutionary War. He is also the a member of the Sons of the Republic of Texas, and his ancestor William B. Bridges was a member of Austin’s Old 300 Colony. His Cox and Sutton ancestors settled in Bell County in the very early 1850’s.


He married Delores Herring in Belton, Texas on June 10, 1957. He is survived by three sons and a daughter: Keith Bailey and wife Viviann of Lansdale, PA, Boyce Bailey and wife Mary of Boise, ID, Doak Bailey and wife Amy of Boise, ID, Regina Bailey Nelson and husband Will of New Albany, OH. He is survived by 8 grandchildren, McKenzie Bailey Berg, Morgan Bailey Goodin, Brannic Bailey, Hodges Bailey, Laken Bailey, Dani Bailey, Lauren Nelson and Evan Nelson. He married Nancy Akin O’Bryant in Mexia, Texas on July14, 1987. Nancy proceeded him in death on August 31, 2016.


Find-a-Grave #171619285


Lineage: Duryl Middleton Bailey > Ardian Leonard Bailey > Polly Beatrice Middleton > Mary Angelina Cox > Fleming Trigg Cox > Samuel Cox Jr. > Martha Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey


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MAYBELLE ‘BONNIE’ BONNER GOWEN (1925-2017)

San Antonio-

MayBelle "Bonnie" Gowen of San Antonio passed away on Thursday, November 23, 2017 at the age of 92. She was born September 11, 1925 in Breckenridge to the late JD and Alice Belle (Hestand) Bonner. She grew up in Crane, Texas. Following graduation from Crane High School she attended Texas Tech where she completed her Bachelor's degree. While at Tech she met Arlee Gowen and they were married on February 16, 1946. Together they shared 68 years before Arlee passed away in 2014. Bonnie taught high school English and Spanish for six years. Later she worked in retail at various stores in Lubbock before going into the Amway business with her husband until the time of their retirement. They moved to San Antonio in 2014. Bonnie was a member of King Ridge Church of Christ.

She was preceded in death by a brother David Bonner.

Those left to cherish her memory are her daughters, Bonnie Lee Hill (Mike) of Dallas, and Connie Louise Hiers, MD (William "Bill" R. Fritz) of San Antonio.

Visitation will begin at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, December 2, 2017 with services starting at 11:00 a.m. at Combest Family Memorial Chapel. Interment will follow at the City of Lubbock Cemetery.

Find-a-Grave #185520021


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JOE EDWARD COX (1950-2018)

Joe Edward Cox, age 67, of Temple formerly of Beeville, TX passed away on Sunday, May 20, 2018 at his home in Temple. He was born on October 21, 1950, in Lampasas the son of Robert Calvin and Mary Alice Cox. On October 13, 1972, in Lampasas Joe married Paula Jean Eckermann.

A graveside service will take place on Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 2:00pm at Kempner Cemetery followed by a Celebration of Life at 3:00pm at Kempner Church of Christ 309 County Rd 3300 Kempner, TX 76539.

Joe was a minister for the Church of Christ having served in Kempner Church of Christ in Kempner, W.S. Young Church of Christ in Killeen as an associate to the military, Mathis Church of Christ in Mathis, Adams St. Church of Christ in Beeville, and University Hills Church of Christ in Austin. He served his country in the United States Army, was a member of the Temple D.A.V., the Lions Club in Beeville, and the NRA.

Joe is survived by his wife Paula of Temple, children, Anissa Cox of Pearland, Amanda Thomas of Temple, Alisha Albrecht and husband Matthew of Liberty Hill and Rance Cox of Temple.

He is also survived by 7 grandchildren, Josiah, Micaylah, Jonah, and Micah Thomas and Reese, Carson, and Jordyn Albrecht.

He was preceded in death by his parents Robert [Calvin] and Mary [Alice Weaver] Cox and his grandparents Marion

[Ezra] and Georgie [Unity Webb] Cox.

In lieu of flowers memorials to the Southaven Church of Christ Shane Ruiz Memorial Fund 1483 Brookhaven Dr. Southaven, MS 38671, the American Cancer Society, or to RSD research would be appreciated.


Find-a-Grave #190736316

Lineage:

Joe Edward Cox > Robert Calvin Cox > Marion Ezra Cox > John Cox > Pleasant C. Cox > Solomon Cox > Thomas Isaac Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey


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ROBERT SCHULER ‘ROY’ COX, JR. of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, passed away on Tuesday, June 10th, 2018.


He was born on March 10, 1944, in Cameron, Texas.


He was preceded in death by his parents, Robert Schuler CoxSr., and Frances Wells and his son, Brian Keith Cox.


He is survived by a son, Michael, and a daughter, Tammy along with many other relatives and friends. George Boom Funeral Home & Crematory in Sioux Falls in charge of arrangements.

Lineage:

Robert Schuler Cox Jr. > Robert Schuler Cox Sr. > Christopher Columbus ‘Alonzo’ Cox > Samuel Hampton ‘Sam’ Cox > Fleming Trigg Cox > Samuel Cox, Jr. > Martha Cox > Solomon Cox, Sr. & Naomi Hussey


CARL EVANS BOCHOW, SR.

Services for Carl E. Bochow, Sr. 88, of Tyler, will be held on Wednesday, August 9, 2017, with graveside services at 10:00

    1. at Rose Hill Cemetery, followed at 11:00 a.m. by the memorial service at First Christian Church with Dr. Chris Pulliam officiating. Visitation will be Tuesday at

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      Stewart Family Funeral Home on August 8, 2017, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

      Carl passed away, Friday, August 4, 2017. He was born September 19, 1928 in Sylvan Grove, KS to Fred and Maude Bochow. He grew up in Salina, KS, graduated from Salina High School and joined the U.S. Navy with 20 friends. After his service, he attended Colorado School of Mines in Golden, CO, earning a B.S. in Petroleum Refining Engineering in 1952. He then started his life in Texas, accepting a position in Baytown with Humble

      Oil and Refining Company, which later became Exxon. In 1953, he moved to Corpus Christi to work for Suntide Refining Company. Soon after, he met the love of his life, Evelyn Cheatham at a Sunday school party. He said he immediately knew that Evelyn was the one for him; however, it took several years for him to convince her of the same. They were married August 18, 1957.

      In May 1960, Carl and Evelyn moved to Tyler to join Howe- Baker Engineers and their first son Carl, Jr. was born in July. In September 1960, they were transferred to New Jersey where Carl had business responsibilities for the Eastern U.S. and Canada. Their second son, Thomas, was born in 1961. As a happy family of four, they enjoyed living close to New York City and its many attractions.

      In the summer of 1962, Carl was promoted to Chief Process Engineer for Howe-Baker and they moved back to Tyler. In 1964, their third son, Robert was born. In 1967, Carl was promoted to Vice President of Sales. At this time he began extensive international travel with Howe-Baker, making frequent and long trips throughout the world. In 1970, Carl was named President of Howe-Baker. In 1974, he and the other company officers organized a leveraged buyout from Howe-Baker’s parent company, Nalco Chemical Company. Howe-Baker thrived and grew in the following years. Serving as the President, CEO and Chairman of the Board of Howe-Baker, Carl led a dynamic organization of engineering and fabrication professionals, designing and building refining and petrochemical facilities throughout the world. Carl was admired for his unfaltering positive attitude and encouraged a culture of openness and camaraderie at Howe-Baker in which everyone felt like family. Carl retired in 1990 after thirty years of service, but remained active with the company as Chairman until 1996.

      Carl had many hobbies and interests. When he moved to Corpus Christi in 1953, he began playing golf, sailing and the new sport of scuba diving. He and Evelyn enjoyed diving

      throughout retirement, making annual dive trips to Bonaire as well as other locations. Carl was an avid golfer and he and Evelyn frequently played together. Carl was attentive to his health and was one of the early joggers, starting around 1964, well before the development of modern day running shoes. During most of his career, he would rise at dawn and head to the Robert E. Lee track for a five mile run. He

      kept a daily log of his runs, surpassing 30,000 miles in 2015. He was proud to say that he had run farther than the circumference of the earth. Carl also enjoyed many hunting and fishing trips with his friends and sons. The family started snow skiing in the mid 70’s, which became a favorite activity that also led to Carl and Evelyn spending much of their retirement years at their second home in Angel Fire, NM, where they developed many close friendships.

      Among Carl’s many interests, science was one of his favorite topics. He enjoyed learning about

      the latest science developments, which led him to being an early adopter of the latest technologies and gadgets, from computers to anything else electronic.

      During retirement, Carl remained active in business through his volunteer work with the Tyler chapter of SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives), providing mentoring to new businesses. He was recently recognized for 20 years of service with SCORE. Carl was also active with Rotary International both in Tyler and Angel Fire. Carl has been a member of First Christian Church in Tyler, since 1960, where he served as an Elder. He was also active with the United Church of Angel Fire in New Mexico, which he and Evelyn helped establish. During retirement, Carl resumed his travels throughout the world, going on many international trips with Evelyn and a group of their close Tyler friends.

      Carl is survived by his loving wife of nearly 60 years, Evelyn, three sons and daughters-inlaw and seven grandchildren: Carl, Jr. and Karen Bochow with their children Clayton and Kathleen; Dr. Thomas and Debra Bochow with their children Samuel and Andrew; Robert and Celeste Bochow with their children Kyle, Maegan and Emily. He is also survived by his younger brother Dr. Jerry Barlow of Baton Rouge, LA and special nephew Scooter Cheatham of Austin and special niece Catherine Rawdon of Carrollton. He was preceded in death by his parents.

      Serving as pallbearers will be: Clayton and Kyle Bochow, Jim Blair, Scooter Cheatham, Boyd Hamilton, Harris Harlan, Dick Pate, Jim Rollins and Les Talbert. Honorary pallbearers are: Samuel and Andrew Bochow.


      Lineage: Husband of Evelyn F. Cheatham

      Evelyn F. Cheatham > Thomas Cook Cheatham > Mary Elizabeth Smart > John White Smart > Amy Cox > Solomon Cox > Thomas Isaac Cox > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey

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      PAULINE ‘POLLY’ ANN CORBETT


      Pauline “Polly” Ann Corbett, daughter of Lelah Pearl Dresbach and Eugene J. Corbett, passed away in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on August 9, 2018. She was born January 21, 1935, in Columbus, Ohio. She attended St. Joseph Academy there, worked her entire career at Galbreath Mortgage Company, through mergers with first Chemical Bank and finally Chase Manhattan Bank, before retiring in 1996. She started as a secretary and worked up to being a loan analyst and post-closing auditor. She received many awards and recognition for her work ethic and dedication. Ten years ago, after a particularly snowy winter, she was enticed to move to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to be near her nieces and nephews. Polly was a wonderful, sweet, kind aunt and great aunt to her many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews.


      Polly traces back to the Dixon and Cox families of southern Ohio through her grandmother, Loie Victoria Tatman b. 1889 near Circleville, Ohio, d/o Barbra Eleanor Ankrom & Jesse Tatman. “Barbra Ella” was the d/o Archibald Ankrom and Mary Stephens of Jackson, Vinton Co., Ohio. Archibald was s/o Joseph Ankrom and Anna Ellison, both of whom died young in Vinton County. Archibald was raised by his maternal grandparents, Thomas Ellison, b. 1788 in what is now Greenbrier Co., W.VA and Olive Alice Cox b.~1788 in VA or KY. Thomas and Olive were married 1806 in Knox Co., KY and came to southern Ohio in about 1810 with Olive’s parents, Solomon Cox Jr. and Mary “Martha” Dixon. Solomon Cox Jr. was b. 1762

      Cane Creek, Orange Co., NC, d. in Missouri, but lived in the area that is now Vinton Co., OH for a decade or so. Solomon Cox Jr. was s/o Solomon Cox Sr. and Naomi Hussey. Mary “Martha” Dixon, is the d/o Jesse Dixon and Lydia.


      [Note: submitted by Maureen Noonan Harbourt, d/o Patricia Lee Corbett and John Paul Noonan. Patricia Lee Corbett was Polly Corbett’s sister.]


      Lineage:

      Pauline Ann ‘Polly’ Corbett > Lelah Pearl Dresbach > Lole Victoria Tatman > Barbra Eleanor Ankrom > Archibald Ankrom > Anna Ellison > Olive Alice Cox

      > Solomon Cox Jr. > Solomon Cox Sr. & Naomi Hussey

      DANIEL DEAN COX


      b. 23 Mar 1949 in Kansas City, Missouri,

      d. 21 Sep 2018 in San Leandro, California,


      Daniel Dean Cox was born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1949. His parents realized they had an unusually bright

      child on their hands when he taught himself to read fro cereal boxes at three years old. He was blessed with an excellent high school science teach who selected him to attend a summer program at Bell Labs. Dan won a full scholarship to Yale where he received his BS in chemistry, then continued at MIT where he received his PHD in organic chemistry.


      While at MIT, Dan met his future wife Jennifer Lilburn, a fellow chemistry PHD student sho shared his love of hiking an lively discussion. Dan and Jennifer moved to California, where Dan began his career as a chemist, and later became an industrial hygienist. Dan eventually moved into consulting, where he spent 35 years in the field of environmental health. He valued work that helped solved problems and improve people’s lives.


      Dan maintained warm friendships throughout his life, from a very young age. Wherever he went, he made and kept new friends. This was one of his chief joys. People were dawn to his humor, intelligence, generosity, and most of all, his kindness.


      He enjoyed music, hiking, cooking, traveling, and spending time with friends and family. Dan was always the first to adopt the latest technological gadget, even before his children had taken a crack at it, and he took great joy in the energy and spirit of the family’s dogs, Mardy, Benji, and Frank. His main avocation, especially after he retired, was helping people, whether they were strangers he had just me or life-long friends. In his last hours, he shared with his family a philosophy for living well — Peace, Love, and Celebration.And we’re all doing it!


      He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Jennifer, and his children — Nathan of Palo Alto, Johnathan of Sacramento, and Caitlin of Brooklyn, New York. He will also be missed by his daughter-in-law Erica, his sister Mary Ann, brother Jerry, brothers-in-law Sam, Tim, and Pat, as well as his beloved nieces and nephews. Dan said, I love much and am much loved. It’s true.


      Lineage:

      Daniel Dean Cox > Claude Raymond Cox > Joseph Oscar Cox

      > William Alonzo Cox > Andrew Baker Cox > Joseph Cox > Solomon Cox Jr. > Solomon Cox & Naomi Hussey


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      Available

      Books & Pin



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      Please email: [email protected] for information


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      Cemetery Headstone/ Marker Project


      MISSION: To assist in restoring a “flat marker” for those headstones deteriorating over time for future generations, or donate a set amount for labor to install the “flat marker.” Brandywine will contribute up to $125.00 for each marker


      PROCEDURES:

      1. Fill out and send in the approved BRANDYWINE CRUCIBLE HEADSTONE RESTORATION/REPLACEMENT REQUEST FORM

      2. Set a standardized size and style “flat marker” and printed information not to exceed three lines or send information for request for labor amount

      3. Send photos of the location and of the headstone with request form.

      4. Families are responsible for finding a monument company and obtaining an estimate for the restoration and/or labor before making the request.

      5. Families will then know if it is feasible to do the work requested for the $125.00, or decide if they want to contribute to cover any additional cost.

      6. Brandywine and the Committee are not responsible for finding a monument company to

        do the marker repair.

      7. Send photos of the completed “flat marker”, or a copy of labor installation.

      8. Cox Line relationship: The ancestor should tie into the 4th generation (e.g. Jehu Cox and Sarah Riddle Pyle) or 5th generation, (e.g. Thomas Isaac and Rachel Carr).

      9. Frequency: There should be one request per family each year depending on the

number of other family submissions.


For information on this project, contact:


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Brandywine Cox Family Notices


For submissions to the Brandywine Crucible Newsletter: [email protected]


For Newsletters Subscriptions: [email protected]

or contact: Lisa Sullivan, 324 Meadowood Road, Cypress, Texas 77019-2640, Phone: 210-275-5167


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SOLICITING FAMILY STORIES to be published in our newsletter and on our website. We want your family stories, whether proven or unproven. Stories put flesh on the bones of genealogy. If a story recurs in your family line, it should be preserved. The stories can revolve around a personality, an event, or any combination. They can be humorous, happy, sad, or even tragic, but if you dee them important to your family, we want to preserve them. There sometimes will be overlap with our autobiography-biography program, which records the lives of individuals, but this will be a separate project. This is an important part of our work to preserve our family history.


PLEASE submit your family stories to Debbie B. Cox, 708 Creekridge Drive, Goodrich, Texas 77335 or email to [email protected]


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Family History Displays wanted for the upcoming 2019 Brandywine Cox Family Reunion


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Join Brandywine Crucible, Inc.


Our family organization is about fellowship and fun, folklore, and family history! Dues are $15,

$25, and $100, depending on the level of support you want to provide. Our dues year run from June 1 to May 31st. It is not necessary to belong to Brandywine Crucible, Inc. to attend any of the Cox reunions. We do want you as a member! Brandywine Crucible, Inc. is a 501c3 corporation, so all contributions are fully tax deductible. Send your new or renewal dues to:

Linda Atkins, Treasurer 6325 Broadway Avenue

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73139-7130


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NEWSLETTER

BRANDYWINE CRUCIBLE

VOLUME I4 ISSUE 2 Fall/Winter 2018


FROM:

Brandywine Crucible, Inc. 800 Franklin Drive

San Marcos, Texas 78666


TO:



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Brandywine Cox Family Notices


For submissions to the Brandywine Crucible Newsletter: [email protected]


Newsletters Subscriptions: [email protected]

or contact: Lisa Sullivan, 324 Meadowood Road, Cypress, Texas 77019-2640, Phone: 210-275-5167


2019 BRANDYWINE COX FAMILY REUNION — DESCENDANTS OF SOLOMON COX AND NAOMI HUSSEY


WHEN: May 31st-June 2nd, 2019

WHERE: Lampasas, Texas

LOCATION: Bar 17 Event Center, 402 South Live Oak, Lampasas, Texas CONTACTS: Linda Atkins, 405-549-6588; [email protected]

Joe Cox, 512-392-2097, [email protected]

Gary Sutton, 325-286-4005, [email protected] LODGING: Best Western Plus (Reunion Headquarters), 512-556-2100