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The Klickitat County Agriculturist, Goldendale, WA., June 17, 1927, page 1

CHARLIE NEWELL, PIONEER, ROUNDED UP BY THE PRESS

     Most people in Klickitat have heard of Charlie Newell, - and hundreds know him personally. Hopkins addition to Goldendale was laid out by him and he resided here until 1896 when he went over to the new town of Toppenish, which has since been his home. The Review of that place recently rounded them up, and drew out the following interesting facts of his life.
     Charles H. Newell, born in Ohio and brought to Oregon when a boy, and came to Goldendale with a band of cattle in 1871. Here he resided and bought cattle for a time. In 1884 he drove a band of over 700 horses overland to Kearney, Nebraska, where they were loaded onto a train and shipped to Ohio, where they were sold. In 1885 he shipped three trainloads of horses from Prosser to New York City. These were the first horses ever shipped out of the Klickitat valley on the Northern Pacific railroad. There were over 1,300 horses in the shipment.
     In 1896, when W.L. Shearer of Goldendale, came to Toppenish as station agent, Mr. Newell shipped out three trainloads of horses. During the Boer war in South Africa Mr. Newell furnished hundreds of horses to the British government. Their horse recruiting station was at Sheridan, Wyoming. All the horses had to be broken to the saddle before being sold. Inspectors would come down from Sheridan and select the horses that met their requirements.
     In 1903-04 the horse business reached its peak, Mr. Newell buying and selling as many as 6,000 head of horses in those years. Then came the beginnings of the automobile, and the horse business went into a decline from which it has never recovered.
     Mr. Newell early became a student of the Indian language and became quite proficient in its use, and through this accomplishment came to be an adviser of the Indians, who for years looked to "Charlie Newell" as the one man with whom they could talk and be understood. Mr. Newell constituted a sort of combined legislative, judicial and executive board all in one.
     With the coming of the automobile and the tractor the horse market began to decline. Mr. Newell secured several fine pieces of farmland, some of which he still owns. In 1902 he built the old frame Toppenish hotel which faced the depot. This he opened to the public on June 3 of that year. Later, in 1907, he built the concrete block portion of the building, which made it an out-standing hotel in this portion of the valley.
     Mr. Newell sold the Toppenish hotel some two or three years ago, but he still lives in Toppenish and takes an interest in its history and its present activities. He occasionally pays a visit to Goldendale, to renew old friendships, his last visit here being about two years ago.


The Klickitat County Agriculturist, Goldendale, WA., December 5, 1930, page 4

CHARLES NEWELL, PIONEER, VISITS IN GOLDENDALE

     Charles H. Newell, a former owner of a large portion of the townsite of Goldendale, now at the head of a large hotel at Toppenish, was in this city several days this week. As he has a wide acquaintance in Klickitat and Central Washington, the Agri. presents a few interesting details of his life.
     Mr. Newell is a native of the Buckeye state, where he was born in 1847. When a small boy, Charles lost his father, thus depriving him of the care and guidance that none can give so well. However, his mother married again and with her family removed to Kansas in 1859, where they lived for four years. Then they immigrated to Colorado, where they spent a year in Denver and the mines, and in 1864 continued their western journey to Oregon, settling in the Willamette valley.
     There the son Charles finished his education. At sixteen years of age, he commenced farming on shares; two years later he rented a farm and resided thereon until 1870, when he bought a band of cattle in Oregon and the following spring brought them to the Klickitat county range. He kept the band until the summer of 1872. Then he returned to Oregon and farmed until 1877, still owning an interest in stock in Klickitat county, to which place he removed his family at this time and filed on a homestead ten miles from Goldendale, where he lived until 1891.
     In 1879 he formed a partnership with W.D. Hoctor, for the purpose of dealing in horses and land, a partnership which lasted for many years, four years of which time, from 1879 to 1883, they sold stock in Oregon. Among their largest shipments were those of 1884, when 700 forces were driven across the plains to Nebraska, where they were shipped to Ohio; of 1885, when 417 head of horses were shipped from Prosser to the New York market; and of 1886, when shipments were made to New York and two car loads sent as far east as Rhode Island. They shipped east until 1888, when they began sending their horses to the Sound and California. In 1892 they shipped extensively to Minnesota.
     In 1871 Mr. Newell's step-father filed on a portion of the townsite of Goldendale and there in 1897, his aged mother passed into the world beyond. Mr. Newell has one brother, Robert J., who lives in Klickitat county, and one sister, Mrs. Oliver Hendricks, also a resident of Klickitat county.
     The year of 1876 witnessed Mr. Newell's marriage in Oregon to Miss Mary Wren. Miss Wren was born in Washington county, Oregon, 1862, and there attended school until she was seventeen years old, when her marriage took place.
     Mr. Newell is today greatly interested in mining, possessing considerable stock. In his talks with the Agri. last week, he was sanguine of the great possibilities in the oil line in Yakima county.


The Klickitat County Agriculturist, Goldendale, WA., July 1, 1927, page 1

CHARLEY NEWELL'S ADDRESS TO ANGRY INDIANS

     Recently that the Agri. mentioned briefly a few details of the life of Charley Newell, a former resident of Goldendale, now running the leading hotel in Toppenish. From the Review of that place we get another viewpoint in the life of Mr. Newell.
     Mr. Newell recently told an interesting incident in which his knowledge of the Indian language and his wide acquaintance with the Indians enabled him to avert a crisis in which a massacre seemed imminent. One night while camping near the old race track which lies about ten miles this side of Fort Simcoe, he heard loud talking in the old "Long House" a little way from there. Listening awhile, he concluded from the vehemence of their language that something unusual was engaging their attention. He quietly made his way to a point near the house, and listening again he learned that they were planning an attack on the agency at Fort Simcoe.
     Knocking at the door, he was met by a guard, who denied him entrance to the assembly room. He insisted that the guard go forward and tell the chief that "Charlie Newell" was at the door and wanted to come in. The guard reluctantly did so, and the chief, who had known Mr. Newell for years, instructed the guard to let him in.
     He entered the building and sat down near the chief and listened awhile of their recital of the injustice they had suffered at the hands of the agency. It seemed that the agency had issued orders forbidding the racing of horses on the track and of gambling dam at their meets. Two or three had been arrested and placed in jail at the Fort for violation of this rule. Horse racing and gambling had been a time honored privilege and pleasure at their meets and they resented the enforcement of this rule. The enforcement of this order, coming to a people in whom an undertone of discontent had long been smoldering, and which had been abbetted by the fiery eloquence of several younger members of the band, had initiated a plan to annihilating the whole personnel of the agency.
     Knowing the Indian habit of mind, Mr. Newell took his time, and finally asked for the privilege to speak. This was granted and he arose and addressed them somewhat as follows:
     "My friends, I know what what you are planning to do. You can do it. You are strong enough and no one can prevent. But let me tell you something. You have known me a long time. I have never told you wrong. Let me tell you my ideas. Try it first and if it doesn't work then go back to your plan.
     Remember this: Mr. Young did not make the order forbidding you to gamble. The order was set out from Washington to Mr. Young and he had to pass it on to you. He couldn't do otherwise. Now listen to my plan. You have young men here who have been in school. They can write. Have them write a letter to Washington telling the secretary that you have always had the privilege of gambling and racing on the track; that it has long been your pastime and pleasure, and that you do not like to give it up.
     Tell him all this and ask him not to enforce the order. Then if this fails you can go back to your plan you have been talking here tonight. But if you don't want to try my plan. If you want to go on and kill the people at the Fort as you are talking here tonight; then listen to what I have to say.
     You can do this. I know you can. But after you have done it, your people, your women and your children, will have to take to the hills. The white man will come. They will come from Yakima. They will come from Seattle. They will come from Portland. They will come from all over. They will outnumber you. You will be hunted down and your women and children will be killed. Now don't do this. Try my plan first. I have never told you wrong."
     Before sitting down Mr. Newell but the question to a vote, asking all those who were in favor of trying his plan to hold up their hand. He states that the entire assemblage voted to try his plan, and that they did draft a request to Washington City, and that it was granted. This was, I believe, the last threat of violence between the races, said Mr. Newell, and it was averted as you have just been told.


The Toppenish Review, Toppenish, WA., February 28, 1932, page 1

CHARLES H. NEWELL, PIONEER OF TOPPENISH, DIES AT HOME
Was Early Stockman in Valley and for Many Years Proprietor of Toppenish Hotel. Active Career Extended Over Many Years. Held Influential Position Among Indians Who Regarded Him As Staunch Friend

     Charles H. Newell, Toppenish pioneer and builder and former proprietor of the Toppenish hotel, died at his home here at midnight Wednesday, February 24, after a brief illness with pneumonia. He had been suffering for several weeks with a cold, but was taken seriously ill last Saturday. He did not improve appreciably from that time until his death. He was 84 years of age.
     The funeral will take place Saturday at 10 a. m. from Drake's funeral parlors. Burial will follow in Zillah cemetery. He is survived by a son, Harold Newell, and a brother, Robert Newell, residing in Klickitat county. Mrs. Newell died just a year ago. A cousin, formerly Miss Marie Stewart, now Mrs. Fred Mitchell of Sunnyside, lived at the Newell home here for several years.
     Charles H. Newell was born in Ohio, September 20, 1847. The family removed to Kansas in 1859. They spent the years of the Civil war in Douglas county near Lawrence, scene of the famous Quantrell raid. Mr. Newell recalled distinctly that stirring episode, the John Brown anti-slavery movement and many other events of the period.

Move to Colorado

     Later the Newells moved to Colorado where Newell Sr. operated a road house, located between Denver and Black Hawk point. In 1864 they crossed the plains by covered wagon heading for the Willamette Valley. They crossed the John Day headwaters near Canyon city, one of the first wagon trains to accomplish that difficult feat. They drove to the Dalles and thence by barge down the Columbia to a six mile railroad portage. A river steamer finally landed the party at Portland. The Dalles at that time was headquarters for all prospectors heading into Idaho and the chief source of supply for the few straggling settlements in the Yakima valley. There were about thirty wagons in the train in which the Newells crossed the plains.

Located at Hillsboro

     From Portland, the family moved to Hillsboro and in 1871, Charles Newell made his first trip into the Yakima valley. With a partner he brought 100 head of cattle to the valley and ranged them in this section. Later they drove a bunch of the animals over Naches pass to Seattle, then a growing lumber village. The finest of bunch grass covered much of the Yakima valley lands at the time, especially on the hillsides.

Stock Raising Industry

     Mr. Newell was married in 1878 to Miss Mary Elizabeth Wren daughter of Michael Wren and Christine Monroe Wren, both of pioneer Oregon families.
     For a number of years Mr. Newell engaged in stock-raising. He bought and sold Indian ponies and took several droves to the eastern mark-ets, going overland as far as Omaha. In 1884, Mr. Newell drove more than 700 horses over the trail to Nebraska. The Northern Pacific railroad was utilized after its completion to Yakima for transporting the stock. He was the first shipper of stock over the Northern Pacific line. He sent three trainloads from Prosser to New York state during the year 1885. Later the biggest shipment of all, 1350 animals was sent from Toppenish to be sold in the east.
     For a number of years, Mr. Newell lived at Goldendale, where the residence he built is still an outstanding land mark. He freighted over the Goldendale road, to Toppenish and on to Ellensburg and Wenatchee.

Locates at Toppenish

     In 1901 he located at Toppenish and three years later built the first unit of the present Toppenish hotel. He continued his farming and livestock enterprises for many years while he was actively engaged in operating the hotel.
     During thirty years of intimate association with the reservation Indians, Mr. Newell was looked upon by them as a friend and counselor and unofficially he settled many disputes and family difficulties that occurred among them. When he told a quarrelsome pair they had better divide their holdings and live apart, his advise was accepted as a decree of divorce and was so regarded by the Indians.
     Since disposing of the hotel he has resided at his home here with occasional trips to his old haunts in Klickitat county and into Oregon. He was constantly visited by his Indian friends who sought his advice long after he had ceased to be actively engaged in business.


The Goldendale Sentinel, Goldendale, WA., March 3, 1932, page 1

CHARLES H. NEWELL, PIONEER OF TOPPENISH, DIES AT HOME

     Charles H. Newell, Toppenish pioneer and builder and former proprietor of the Toppenish hotel, died at his home at Toppenish at midnight Wednesday, February 24, after a brief illness with pneumonia. He had been suffering for several weeks with a cold, but was taken seriously ill last Saturday. He did not improve appreciably from that time until his death. He was 84 years of age.
     The funeral took place Saturday at 10 a. m. from Drake's funeral parlors. Burial followed in the Zillah cemetery. He is survived by a son, Harold Newell, and a brother, Robert Newell, residing in Klickitat county. Mrs. Newell died just a year ago. A cousin, formerly Miss Marie Stewart, now Mrs. Fred Mitchell of Sunnyside, lived at the Newell home here for several years.
     Charles H. Newell was born in Ohio, September 20, 1847. The family removed to Kansas in 1859. They spent the years of the Civil war in Douglas county near Lawrence, scene of the famous Quantrell raid. Mr. Newell recalled distinctly that stirring episode, the John Brown anti-slavery movement and many other events of the period.

Move to Colorado

     Later the Newells moved to Colorado where Newell Sr. operated a road house, located between Denver and Black Hawk point. In 1864 they crossed the plains by covered wagon heading for the Willamette valley. They crossed the John Day head-waters near Canyon city, one of the first wagon trains to accomplish that difficult feat. They drove to The Dalles and thence by barge down the Columbia to a six mile railroad portage. A river steamer finally landed the party at Portland. The Dalles at that time was headquarters for all prospectors heading into Idaho and the chief source of supply for the few straggling settlements in the Yakima valley. There were about thirty wagons in the train in which the Newells crossed the plains.
     From Portland, the family moved to Hillsboro and in 1871, Charles Newell made his first trip into the Yakima valley. With a partner he brought 100 head of cattle to the valley and ranged them in this section. Later they drove a bunch of the animals over Naches pass to Seattle, then a growing lumber village. The finest of bunch grass covered much of the Yakima valley lands at the time, especially on the hillsides.

Stock Raising Industry

     Mr. Newell was married in 1878 to Miss Mary Elizabeth Wren daughter of Michael Wren and Christine Monroe Wren, both of pioneer Oregon families.
     For a number of years Mr. Newell engaged in stock-raising. He bought and sold Indian ponies and took several droves to the eastern markets, going overland as far as Omaha. In 1884, Mr. Newell drove more than 700 horses over the trail to Nebraska. The Northern Pacific railroad was utilized after its completion to Yakima for transporting the stock. He was the first shipper of stock over the Northern Pacific line. He sent three trainloads from Prosser to New York state during the year 1885. Later the biggest shipment of all, 1350 animals was sent from Toppenish to be sold in the east.
     For a number of years, Mr. Newell lived at Goldendale, where the residence he built is still an outstanding land mark. He freighted over the Goldendale road to Toppenish and on to Ellensburg and Wenatchee.

Locates at Toppenish

     In 1901 he located at Toppenish and three years later built the first unit of the present Toppenish hotel. He continued his farming and livestock enterprises for many years while he was actively engaged in operating the hotel.
     During thirty years of intimate association with the reservation Indians, Mr. Newell was looked upon by them as a friend and counselor and unofficially he settled many disputes and family difficulties that occurred among them. When he told a quarrelsome pair they had better divide their holdings and live apart, his advise was accepted as a decree of divorce and was so regarded by the Indians.
     Since disposing of the hotel he has resided at his home here with occasional trips to his old haunts in Klickitat county and into Oregon. He was constantly visited by his Indian friends who sought his advice long after he had ceased to be actively engaged in business. - Toppenish Review.


The Klickitat County Agriculturist, Goldendale, WA., March 4, 1932, page 14

CHAS. NEWELL, PIONEER, DIES AT THE AGE OF 84

     Charles H. Newell, Toppenish pioneer and builder and former proprietor of the Toppenish hotel, died at his home there at midnight Wednesday, February 24, after a brief illness with pneumonia. He was 84 years of age.
     For a number of years, Mr. Newell lived at Goldendale, with the residence he built is still an outstanding landmark. He freighted over the Goldendale road to Toppenish and onto Ellensburg and Wenatchee.
     He is survived by a son, Harold Newell, and a brother, Robert Newell, residing in Klickitat county. Mrs. Newell died just a year ago. A cousin formerly Miss Marie Stewart, now Mrs. Fred Mitchell of Sunnyside, lived at the Newell home in Toppenish for several years.
     Robert Newell, his only surviving brother, resides on the Rock Creek, about 35 miles from Goldendale. He and his wife have been on this place since 1871, and are among the few surviving pioneers of that time who have resided continuously in Klickitat county. He is a year younger than his brother Charles, who has just passed away.
     In 1885 Charles Newell came to Goldendale and laid off what is known as Hokkins addition - named after a brother-in-law. As stated above, the house is still standing and in good condition. It is located near Columbus avenue.
     For a number of years Mr. Newell engaged in stockraising. He bought and sold Indian ponies and took several droves to the eastern markets, going overland as far as Omaha. In 1884, Mr. Newell drove more than 700 horses over the trail to Nebraska. The Northern Pacific railroad was utilized after its completion to Yakima for transporting the stock. He was the first shipper of stock over the Northern Pacific line. He sent three trainloads from Prosser to New York state during the year 1885. Later the biggest shipment of all, 1350 animals was sent from Toppenish to be sold in the east.
     Charles H. Newell was born in Ohio, September 20, 1847. The family removed to Kansas in 1859. They spent the years of the Civil war in Douglas county near Lawrence, scene of the famous Quantrell raid. In 1864 they crossed the plains by covered wagon heading for the Willamette valley. There were about thirty wagons in the train in which the Newells crossed the plains.
     In 1871 Charles Newell made his advent into Klickitat county. With a partner (Hopkins) he bought 100 head of cattle to the Klickitat valley and ranged them into this section.
     In 1901 Newell located at Toppenish and three years later built the first unit of the present Toppenish hotel. He continued his farming and livestock enterprises for many years while he was actively engaged in operating the hotel.
     Mr. Newell was married in 1878 to Miss Mary Elizabeth Wren, daughter of Michael Wren and Christina Monroe Wren, both pioneer Oregon families. Since disposing of the Toppenish hotel he has resided at the home there with occasional trips to his old haunts and Klickitat county and into Oregon.


The Klickitat County Agriculturist, Goldendale, WA., February 27, 1931, page 1

DEATH OF TWO WELL KNOWN PIONEERS

     Mrs. Charles H. Newell died at St. Elizabeth's hospital, Yaki-ma, Tuesday, February 17. She had been a patient at the hospital for six weeks prior to her death. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Drake's chapel in Toppenish.
     Mrs. Newell (Mary Elizabeth Wren) was born in Washington county, Oregon. She was married to Charles H. Newell in 1886 and shortly thereafter the couple located at Goldendale, where Mr. Newell had previously been engaged in   ranching and stock raising.
     They resided in Goldendale for many years, and started what is known as Hopkins' addition, their home being in the red building on Columbus avenue, which is still standing.
     The family moved to Toppenish in 1900 and Mr. Newell built the Toppenish hotel, which he owned and operated a number of years.
     In addition to her husband, Mrs. Newell is survived by her son Harold and by four sisters, all residing in Portland, Ore. They are Mrs. Emma Wilson, Lulu Shea, Miss Anna Wren and Mrs. Lillian Moon. All of the sisters except Mrs. Moon were in Toppenish for the funeral, as were also Mr. and Mrs. Harold Newell, also of Portland.



The Toppenish Review, Toppenish, WA., February 20, 1931, page 1

MRS. CHARLES H. NEWELL

     Mrs. Charles H. Newell died at St. Elizabeth's hospital, Yakima, Tuesday, February 17. She had been a patient at the hospital for six weeks prior to her death. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at Drake's chapel.
     Rev. Ernest Goudge conducted the services. John Packwood sang "Still, Still With Thee," and "One Sweetly Solemn Thought." Pall bearers were John Siegel, Grant Shelton, A.C. Bonebrake, J.W. Warrell, Walter Chambers and W.M. McGowan. Interment in the family plot at Zillah followed the funeral.
     Mrs. Newell (Mary Elizabeth Wren), was born in Washington county, Oregon. She was married to Charles H. Newell in 1886 and shortly thereafter the couple located at Goldendale, Wash., where Mr. Newell had previously been engaged in ranching and stock raising.
     The family moved to Toppenish in pioneer days and Mr. Newell built the Toppenish hotel, which he owned and operated for many years.
     In addition to her husband, Mrs. Newell is survived by their son Harold and by four sisters, all residing in Portland, Ore. They are Mrs. Emma Wilson, Mrs. Lulu Shea, Miss Anna Wren and Mrs. Lillian Moon. All of the sisters except Mrs. Moon were in Toppenish for the funeral, so were also Mr. and Mrs. Harold Newell, also of Portland. A niece of Mr. Newell, Miss Marie Stewart, has been a member of the household for a number of years.

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