Descendants of PHILIP KINSEY

 

Descendants of PHILIP KINSEY

Generation No. 1 

1. PHILIP1 KINSEY. 

Notes

From the "Bey" Family History; "Philip Kinsey of Lower Peover, probably identical with Philip whom Ormerod calls of Blackden, had two sons, Philip and Ralph, and a grandson John."

 Children of PHILIP KINSEY are:

2. i. RALPH2 KINSEY.

ii. PHILIP KINSEY.

 

Generation No. 2 

2. RALPH2 KINSEY (PHILIP1).

 Notes

According to "Bey" Family History, John Kinsey is the grandson of Philip, whether the son of Philip or Ralph is not stated, but probably the son of Ralph.

 Also from the same source; Ralph is probably the Ralph, or the father of Ralph, who married Jane Chester in 1620.

 Child of RALPH KINSEY is:

3. i. JOHN3 KINSEY, d. 1619.

 

Generation No. 3 

3. JOHN3 KINSEY (RALPH2, PHILIP1) died 1619.

 Notes

The "Bey" Family History states;

John Kinsey is the grandson of Philip Kinsey, his father is Philip or Ralph it is not clearly stated which one, but probably the son of Ralph. He settled in Wales, at a place called Dethienith, near Landinam and Radnor in Montgomeryshire about 30-40 miles from Blackden, and was the ancestor of the Welsh family to which Mr. Ronald Stuart Kinsey belongs. He died 1619 leaving a will from which it appears he had five sons and two daughters.

 Children of JOHN KINSEY are:

4. i. THOMAS4 KINSEY, d. ABT 1640.

ii. EDMUND KINSEY I.

iii. WILLIAM KINSEY.

iv. JOHN KINSEY.

v. MORRIS KINSEY.

vi. MARGARET KINSEY.

vii. MAUD KINSEY.

 

Generation No. 4 

4. THOMAS4 KINSEY (JOHN3, RALPH2, PHILIP1) died ABT 1640.

 Notes

As per the "Bey" Family History, Thomas was of Dethienith, a place in Wales near Landinam and Radnor in Montgomeryshire, and died about 1640.

 Children of THOMAS KINSEY are:

5. i. DAVID5 KINSEY I.

ii. THOMAS KINSEY.

iii. ROBERT KINSEY, d. 1656.

iv. EDWARD KINSEY.

v. HUGH KINSEY.

 

Generation No. 5 

5. DAVID5 KINSEY I (THOMAS4, JOHN3, RALPH2, PHILIP1).

 Notes

As per the "Bey" Family History, David was from Dethienith, a place in Wales near Landinam and Radnor in Montgomeryshire.

 Children of DAVID KINSEY are:

6. i. JOHN6 KINSEY, b. Much Haddam Herfordshire England; d. August 14, 1677, Shackamaxon Upland (now Chester) PA.

ii. RALPH KINSEY.

iii. EDMUND KINSEY II.

 

Generation No. 6 

6. JOHN6 KINSEY (DAVID5, THOMAS4, JOHN3, RALPH2, PHILIP1) was born in Much Haddam Herfordshire England, and died August 14, 1677 in Shackamaxon Upland (now Chester) PA. He married (FNU) KINSEY.

 Notes

This information came from Chapter IV of "A Family History" by Martha Jane Humphries Kinsey.

 According to the family records of George Kinsey, the first of the name to settle in this country, with whom we can claim relationship, was John Kinsey. He was an English Quaker originally from the village of Much Haddam, Hertfordshire, England and was a friend and associate of George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends. While living in England he was frequently put in prison with Fox for non-payment of thithes. In the year 1677, John Kinsey sailed from England in the ship 'Kent' and landed in this country June 16 at Newcastle on the Delaware River. Settlement was made by the emigrants of the ship 'Kent' at what is now known as Burlington, N.J. John, however, selected and bought three hundred acres of land of Laurenz Cock, a Swede, on the west side of the Delaware River above the mouth of the Schuylkill, embracing the locality which afterwards became famous for Penn's Treaty Tree, and which is now included in the city of Philadelphia. John Kinsey died August 14, 1677, before the purchase was completed, and at a court held at Upland (now Chester), Pa., on November 12, 1678, Laurenz Cock appeared before the Justice and made formal acknowledgement of his deed of conveyance to Elizabeth Kinsey, daughter of John, and heir to the land. John Kinsey was one of the Commissioners for the settlement of New Jersey under the purchase of Edward Byllinge.

 The children of John Kinsey were:

I. John Kinsey, of Shackamaxon, d. 1698. His will mentions brother and sister:

II. Benjamin Kinsey

III. Elizabeth Kinsey, m. Thomas Fairman.

IV. David Kinsey, probably a son of John Kinsey, although the relationship has

not been definitely established

David Kinsey of the Parish of Nantmeal, County of Radnor, Wales, a carpenter by trade, came from Bristol, England, to Philadelphia, bringing a certificate from the Friends Meeting at Bristol, dated June 26, 1682. This certificate does not name a wife, and he was probably married in or near Philadelphia within a year of his arrival, to Magdalen (there is no record of Magdalen Kinsey's maiden name). A deed records his purchase of one hundred acres of land from Richard Davies, and from the records of the Board of Property, we learn that a tract of three hundred acres was laid out to David Kinsey in Radnor Township in the Welsh Tract, and in right thereof, the town lot to which he was entitled, was laid out on Chestnut Street, a part of the present site of Independence hall. This tract, however, was never patented to David but after his death was conveyed in several parts to his widow and his son "on ye 20th day of 9th mo., 1690." David Kinsey was a member of the Society of Friends and was affiliated with the monthly meeting known at different periods as Radnor, Haverford, and Merion Monthly Meeting. Among the records of this monthly meeting there is a list of burials at "The Burying Place of Haverford, west side of the Schuylkill," and on the list is this record: "David Kinsey buried ye 7th day of the 7th mo., 1687."

 After the death of David Kinsey, Magdalen Kinsey, his widow, married, secondly Howell James, widower of Radnor Township. The marriage took place at the house of David Price under the auspices of the Radnow Monthly Meeting. The certificate of marriage is recorded in full with the names of twenty-five witnesses, one of whom was John Kinsey, son of the bride. Magdalen Kinsey James died sometime prior to March, 1715.

 Howell James married thirdly, Phoebe More, on March 25, 1715. He lived for some years in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, later removing to New Castle County, where he served as overseer of New castle Preparative Meeting. An indulged meeting was held at his house which was discontinued July 7, 1717, "our Friend Howell Kinsey being deceased."

 The children of David Kinsey and Magdlen Kinsey were:

1. John Kinsey

2. Elinore Kinsey

3. Edmund Kinsey

 John Kinsey married first, Sarah Stevens in August, 1687, under the auspices of the Philadelphia Monthly Meeting. The records show that he was very active in the affairs of the meeting until after the death of his wife, Sarah, July 11, 1702, filling the positions of Trustee and Overseer and was constantly in attendance. About the year 1703, he moved to Woodbridge, N.J., though still retaining the office of trustee of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting. He married secondly, Grace Fitz Randolf, on March 1, 1704. He united with the Woodbridge Monthly meeting of Friends and took active interest therein until his death. He was very active in political affairs during the controversy between the Assembly of East Jersey and Daniel Coxe. On May 21, 1716, the friends of Governor Hunter got together, thirteen members of Assembly being sufficient for a quorum; they organized the deposed Dr. Coxe, both as speaker and member of the House, and elected John Kinsey speaker in his place, a position which he held until his death, January 22, 1731. Smith's History of Friends in the Province of Pennsylvania, made a religious visit to New England in 1703, John Kinsey visiting the island of Nantucket, "where he was instrumental in promoting the interests of Quakers.' The son of John and Sarah Stevens Kensey was:

a. John Kinsey

 John Kinsey was born at Burlington, NJ, in 1693. He married Mary Kearny, daughter of Philip Kearny of Woodbridge, NJ, on July 9, 1725. He removed to Philadelphia in the year 1730, was elected a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly the following year and later chosen its speaker. In 1737, he was sent to Maryland to negotiate the settlement of a boundary dispute. He was Attorney General of Pennsylvania from 1738 to 1744. He was chosen Chief Justice of Pennsylvania in 1743 and remained in that position for the rest of his life. In 1745 John Kinsey was one of the Commissioners, who, with the Commissioners from New York and Connecticut, negotiated at Albany, NY, a treaty with the Six Nations.

During his early years of practice as a Lawyer, Governor Keith of Pennsylvania once ordered him to remove his hat in the Court of Chancery. This act gave such offense to the Quakers that the consequent agitation resulted in the publication of an order "that any person professing to be one of the people called Quakers" should be permitted to address the Court without having to conform to the usual ceremony of uncovering the head. John Kinsey died at Burlington, NJ, May 11, 1750. His son was:

James Kinsey

 James Kinsey was born in Philadelphia on March 22, 1731. He married Sarah Deacon and settled in Burlington, NJ, where he took up the practice of law, practicing both in the courts of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. In 1772, he was chosen to serve in the New Jersey Assembly and was leader of the opposition to Governor William Franklin (the last Tory governor of New Jersey, and the illegitimate son of Dr. Benjamin Franklin). James was a member of the original Continental Congress and took his seat at Philadelphia September 5, 1774. He resigned, however, on Novemer 22, 1775, owing to religious scruples on the subject of test oaths. The degree of LL.D. was conferred upon him by Princeton University in 1790. He was the intimate friend of Governor Livingston (the first patriot governor of New Jersey) and after the Revolutionary War was elected Chief Justice of New Jersey, 1789, in which position he served until his death. James Kinsey died at Burlington, NJ, on January 4, 1803.

 Edmund Kinsey, b. 1683, second son of David and Magdalen Kinsey, married Sarah Ogburn on August 21, 1708. The records of Newark Monthly Meeting held at Center, May 3, 1708, show that Howell James (Edmund's stepfather) appeared and produced a letter from his wife's son, Edmund Kinsey, requesting certificate of this meeting of his clearness in relation to marriage, and at the following meeting a certificate was signed for Edmund Kinsey to Woodbridge Meeting in order for his marriage with Sarah Ogburn. The marriage took place at the house of Nathaniel Fitz-Randolph, stepfather of the bride. In 1715 the Woodbridge Monthly Meeting granted a certificate of removal to Falls Monthly Meeting in Bucks County, PA, to Edmund Kinsey, his wife, Sarah Ogburn Kinsey, and Jane Fitz-Randolph, his mother-in-law. Edmund settled in Buckingham Township, purchasing five hundred acres surrounding Buckingham Meeting House, which had been erected only a few years prior to his removal. He was a very earnest Quaker, and in the Falls Monthly Meeting of December, 1717, he received a minute of approval to the Meeting of Ministers and Elders. He was one of the early prominent ministers of Buckingham Meeting, and traveled considerably "in the service of the truth." He also established the first scythe and axe factory in Buckingham, in which a tilt hammer, run by water power was used. He died at the residence in Buckingham on December 21, 1759, having served forty years in the ministry. His wife, Sarah Ogburn Kinsey, survived him and died in her ninety-seventh year.

 Jane and Samuel Ogburn, parents of Sarah Ogburn, Edmund Kinsey's wife, came from Scotland and settled in New Jersey. After the death of Samuel, Jane Ogburn married secondly, John Hampton, and thirdly, Nathaniel Fitz-Randolph, and after her removal to Bucks County with her daughter and son-in-law, she married fourth, Hugh Sharp. Her sons by John Hampton followed her to Bucks County, and their descendants are prominently identified with that county for several generations.

 In a deed recorded at Trenton, in the West Jersey records, Liber B., part 2, page 705, there is a reference to "Lots lately in the tenure of Samuel Ogburn, first husband of Jane Hampton."

 The children of Edmund and Sarah Ogburn Kinsey were:

I. Samuel Kinsey, b. October 20, 1710, m. Elizabeth Crew.

II. Davis (or David) Kinsey, b. September 3, 1712, m. 1st, Tamar Fell; m. 2nd , Sarah Canly

III. Mary Kinsey, b. February 20, 1715, m. Joseph Fell, Dec. 1735

IV. Elizabeth Kinsey, b. Sept. 23, 1717

V. John Kinsey, b. Feb. 5, 1719

VI. Joseph Kinsey, b June 21, 1722

VII. Sarah Kinsey, b. Nov. 13, 1724

VIII. Benjamin Kinsey, b. Oct. 22, 1727

IX. Jonathan Kinsey, b. march 3, 1731

 Samuel Kinsey, born October 20, 1710, at Woodbridge, NJ, moved with his parents to Bucks County PA, in 1715. there he married Elizabeth Crew on July 14, 1733.

Their children were:

I. Thomas Kinsey, m. Margaret Smith

Samuel Kinsey, m. Sarah Ingham.

David Kinsey, m. Mary Hibbs

Jonathan Kinsey, m. Martha Gillingham

Elizabeth Kinsey, m. Alexander Brown

John Kinsey, m. Margaret Kitchen. (Ancestors of Mrs. James McFarland).

Sarah Kinsey, m. David Fell

Benjamin Kinsey, m. Dorothy Doan

  Samuel Kinsey was born May 1734. He was married to Sarah Inham, daughter of Jonathan Ingham, at Newhope, Bucks County, on December 1, 1762. He removed from Bucks County to Baltimore, MD, and on December 8, 1776, he enlisted in the Revolutionary Army. He held a commission as Lieutenant in Dean's Company, Seventh Rgiment, Maryland Regulars, and served throughout the war in General Smallwood's campaigns. He returned to Bucks County after the war in 1783. His wife having died during his absence, and his children having become scattered and provided for by his more prosperous relatives, he sought to start life over again by removing the same year, 1783, to the "Redstone Country" with other Revolutionary veterans. he settled in Menallen Township, Fayett County, and lived there for the remainder of his life. the exact date of his death is not known but John Rhoads filed a bond as administrator of his estate on March 18, 1793.

 The children of Samuel and Sarah Ingham Kinsey were:

 I. Ulysses Kinsey, b. October 18, 1763

II. Jonas Kinsey, b. Oct. 18, 1766

III. Ingram Kinsey, b. April 3, 1769

IV. Charles Kinsey, b. 1773, m. Deborah Whealy

V. Deborah Kinsey, b. July 28, 1780, m. Oct. 18, 1808, Mahlon Smith, of Tinicum Township, Bucks County, son of Joseph and Ann Smith.

 Charles Kinsey was born in Baltimore, MD, in 1773. He returned with his mother to Bucks County, PA, in the spring of 1777, following his father's enlistment. He was apprenticed to Frederick Long to learn the trade of papermaking and this apprenticeship lasted until May 18, 1791. He was married to Deborah Whealey on April 5, 1795. Charles Kinsey was a judge in the New Jersey courts and during President Monroe's administration he was a member to Congress. On March 3, 1820, delivered a speech advocating the passage of the missouri Compromise, that is believed to have secured the passege of the bill.

 He was the inventor of a machine for making paper in a continuous sheet, andd secured foreign patents for his invention in 1807 and 1808, while a member of the firm of Kinsey, Crane and Fairchild, of Paterson, NJ. His rights were afterwards conveyed to Messrs. H. and F. Fourdrinier of France, who improved his machine, and whose names are now continues in general use. Charles Kinsey built the machine almost single handed, owing to the prejudice against innovations that existed among his associates. His earnest faith in the correctness of his ideas, and his stuborn persistency in attempting the solution of what was believed to be a problem impossible of solution, where in the end rewarded.

 After many months of hard work by day and night, his machine was completed. One Saturday night about bedtime, people living in the vicinity of the mill were startled by the sound of the water wheel, which had been started up. Some of them went to the mill and finding all the doors locked, and being unable to get any answer to their knocks for admission, went home to bed. The clatter at the mill continued all Sunday, and on Monday morning, when the mill building, covering the doors and windows. This was the first long sheet of papter ever made and was Charles Kinsey's only rebuke to his traducers.

 The machine with which this feat was accomplished was called the "wooden man", owing to its having been made almost entirely of wood, and is the machine now known in its improved form in the trade of paper making as the "Fourdriner Machine."

 Charles Kinsey died at his home in Paterson, June 25, 1849, and his wife, Deborah Whealey Kinsey, died in the spring of 1856.

 Mrs Rachel Kinsey Catioon, granddaughter of Charles Kinsey, writes, "Grandfather frequently spoke of his relative, James Kinsey, a noted lawyer" (the Chief Justice of PA.)...."When we children were small we were always so pleased to see grandfather come to our house. He was always pleasant and agreeable and very entertaining. He wore a broad-brimmed hat and a cloak with a cape, for he was of Quaker origin. I never saw anyone have such a beautiful hand, soft and dimpled. He often took Southern trips, as he owned land in South Carolina (which was never claimed by the family), and on his return would relate many amusing stories of southern life." (These Carolina lands were supposed to hold valuable gold deposits.) In another letter Mrs. Cation says, "Father very frequently spoke of . . . . . John Kinsey, a relative of grandfather's. He made a petition to the king in 1728, pleading for separating of the government of the province of New Jersey from New York."

 Letters from Dr. William thornton, Washington, DC, the Hon John Culpepper, MC, dated Society Hill, S.C., January 15, 1825, and one from Governor David r. Williams, dated 1824, were among Charles Kinsey's effects, and prove interesting reading regarding prospecting and gold mining at this period.

 The children of Charles and Deborah Whealey Kinsey were:

 I. (Jonathan) Ingram Kinsey, m. Maria Bower

II. Isaiah Kinsey, b. Sept. 20, 1797

III. Charles Smith Kinsey, b. April 17, 1799. His daughter was:

a. Rachel Kinsey, M. Mr. Cation.

IV. Eliza Kinsey, b. March 18, 1801

V. Maria Kinsey, b. June 3, 1802

VI. Isreal Kinsey

VII. Euphemia Kinsey

VIII. Sarah Kinsey

IX. Ann Kinsey

 (Jonathan) Ingham Kinsey was born at Elizabethtown, NJ, on February 5, 1796. He married Maria Brower, April 20, 1818. As his father before him he was engaged in paper making. He died at Newwark, NJ, September 3, 1856.

The Children of Maria Brower Kinsey and Ingham Kinsey are:

 I. Charles Kinsey, m. Rachiel Knapp

II. Maria Kinsey

III. William Bogardus Kinsey, m. Imogen Slater

IV. Ingham Kinsey

V. Isaiah Kinsey

VI. Eliza Kinsey, m. Mr. Weber of Newark, NJ

VII. Peter Kinsey, m. Hannah Deaney.

VIII. Christina Kinsey

IX. George Kinsey, m. first, Anne Sauson; secondly, Judith Gay

  William Bogardus Kinsey was born at Newark, NJ, October 13, 1823. He was married January 29, 1848, to Imogen Slater, born October 13, 1830. As a young man he was associated with Seth Boyden of Newark, NJ, in the patent leather business. In 1850 William moved to Philadelphia and Pittsburgh and thence to Cincinnati in 1853, where he established a patent leather factory under the name of Kinsey and Kraft, in Bailey's Court. As a chemist of national prominence he was often called upon by specialists for consultation on different problems. Among his inventions was the making of flexible patent leather. His process of aterproffing leather is used today. William Bogardus Kinsey died July 26, 1905. His wife, Imogen Slater Kinsey, died August 27, 1911.

Their children were:

 I. George (Boyden) Kinsey, b. December 25, 1848, d. Oct. 12, 1932,

m. Martha Jane Humphreys

II. Frank Kinsey, b. Oct. 28, 1850, d Aug. 6, 1920, m. Abagail Black.

They had three children who died in infancy.

III. Edmond Kinsey, b. Nov. 8, 1852, d. Oct. 1, 1876, at Bleize, Br. Hond.

IV. Frederick Kinsey (1), b. September 8, 1855, d. May 16, 1857

V. Emma Kinsey (1), B. Nov. 8, 1857, d. Oct. 2, 1859

VI. Frederick Kinsey (2), b. May 21, 1860, d. September 5, 1903,

m. first, Florence Moore. Their son was:

1. Paul Kinsey, m. Marie Werner. Their children are:

a. Florence Alice Kinsey

b. George Paul Kinsey

Frederick Kinsey m. secondly, Zora Antrim, daughter of Francis Titus

and Mary Ann Kemp Antrim. Their children are:

1. Jane Kinsey, b. June 11, 1894

2. Dorothy Kinsey, b. April 9, 1896, m. april 6, 1920, Douglas grant Meldrum.

Their children are:

a. Jane Meldrum, b. May 9, 1922

b. Douglas Grant meldrum, Jr., b. June 5, 1925

c. Ann meldrum, b. May 10, 1929

 VII. Emma Kinsey (2), b. August 31, 1862, m. Frank e. ewing.

Their children are:

1. Frank Kinsey Ewing, m. three times. His first wife was Susanna Northrop.

By his second wife he had one daughter:

a. Martha Ewing.

By his third wife, Frank Kinsey Ewing had:

b. A son.

2. Laurence Ewing, m. Mary Winslow. Their children

a. A daughter.

b. A daughter

 VIII. Harry Kinsey, b. January 28, 1856, d. March 25, 1929, m. first, Kate Dorsey,

b. November 3, 1865, d. July 21, 1907. Their children are:

1. Samuel Kinsey, b. March 14, 1887

2. Wilson Kinsey, b. July 28, 1889,

m. December 6, 1919, Edna Smith, b. August 24, 1893. Their children are:

a. Betty Kinsey, b. November 4, 1920

b. Wilson Kinsey, Jr., b. December 17, 1923

c. Ann Kinsey, b. June 30, 1931

3. Alice Kinsey, b. Sept. 12, 1896, m. August 19, 1921,

Alfred Denson Crowell, b. December 6, 1889

a. George Benson Crowell, b. July 31, 1922, d. Jan. 6, 1934

b. Richard Kinsey Crowell, b. Sept. 20, 1925

c. Catherine Jane Crowell, b. April 26, 1930

4. Grace Kinsey, b. February 26, 1900

m. May 29, 1924, Jesse Pease, b. march, 1893.

They live at Hilo, Hawaii.

Their children are:

a. James Kinsey Pease, b. February 24, 1925

b. Jerry Pease, b. January 18, 1927

c. Alice jane Pease, B. August 9. 1935

 Harry Kinsey, m. secondly, June 19, 1909, Clara Sullivan, b. may 16, 1891.

 IX. Samuel Kinsey, b. Feb. 10, 1867, m. Elizabeth Diercks, b. 1864, d. Jan. 15, 1933.

 X. Richard Kinsey, b. Sept 23, 1869, d. Feb. 4, 1917, m. Anna Dorsey,

b. April 1, 1869, d. Aug. 6, 1929.

Their Children are:

1. Edith Kinsey, b. June 13, 1904, m. Harvey Linford Drew, b. 1903.

They lived at Maracaibo, Venezuela. Their daughter:

a. Ann Drew, b. November 29, 1932

 This comes from the book, "History of the Bye Family and Some Allied Families," by Arthur Edwin Bye. Researched by Frances Waite

 Kinsey of Cheshire and of Buckingham Pennsylvania with Crew

 The name Kinsey is of Saxon origin, derived from the Anglo-Saxon "Cynesige," meaning "Noble victor," thus the family of Kinsey does not trace its lineage to any Norman overlords. Yet, as is not often the case with noble English families, we find the name as early as the tenth century. Kynsy was bishop of Litchfield A. D. 960. And in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle it is recorded that Kinsey held the bishopric of York, 1053 and 1060. "And Kinsey," so the Chronicle runs, "Archbishop of York, departed in the Kalends of January and lies at Peterborough." 1060.

In post-Conquest times the family was evidently obscure, but in the fourteenth century they were becoming locally prominent. We find a record of the year 1387 which states that Thomas, son of Robert Kynsy of Lostock Granham, was among the grantees of land. From this time on the names of Robert and John are frequent in the family.

In 1398 Robert, Thomas and William Kinsey were living at Blackden. This is a small township, omitted in Doomsday, and apparently deriving its name from a wooded dean or valley southeast of Goostrey. It most probably was included at an early date in Goostrey, and appears to be the same with that fourth part of the said vill, which after being granted by Lidulph de Twemlowe to his youhnger son, Michael, continued as the seat of his descendants, who assumed this local name. In 1400 Thomas, son of William Kinsey of the Lee, is mentioned. In 1442 Thomas Kinsey was collector of a subsidy in Northwich Hundred, Cheshire, and in 1488-1502 William Kinsey was the same.

The prominence of the Kinsey family in Blackden dates from the time of Robert, who, about 1498 married the heiress of the ancient Goosetree family. As the Goosetree pedigree goes back to the time of the Conquest, we will insert it here.

Arms of Goosetree of Goosetree: Argent, a chevron between three squirrels sejant gules.

These are the arms also of the ancient family of Twemlowe of Twemlowe, and of Knots ford of Twemlowe. This indicates that these two families, as well as the Goosetrees, originated in the same place.

1. Wulfric, a Saxon was lord of Croxton under Ormus de Tuchett in the time of Edward the Confessor; it is thought he was a kinsman of William fitz Nigel, baron of Halton.

2. Waltheof fitz Nigel, his son, was father of,

3. Lieulph, or Lidulph, de Croxton, whose son,

4. Lidulph II was living in the reigns of Richard I and John. He had five sons:

I. Richard, lord of Croxton

II. Robert, lord of Winington

III. Michael

IV. Gilbert

V. Warin de Clyve

5. Michael inherited Goosetree, anciently spelled Gostre, and was living in the reign of Edward I.

6. Thomas de Goosetree, his son, living in the reign of Edward II, married Alianore, daughter of William Mainwaring, lord of Peover, descended from Hugh de Bayeux, and had,

7. William de Goosetree of Blackden, who married Alice, daughter of Robert Hadley, and had,

8. William II, called Wilkin, of Blackden, who died, about 1498, leaving two daughters:

I. Annis, who married 9. Robert Kinsey of Blackden

II. Alice, who married Jack Snelsome

10. William Kinsey, son of Robert and Annis, was a minor in 1498. He was a coheir of the Goosetree estates and had two sons:

I. John

II. Philip

From this time we find three families of Kinsey seated at Blackden. The above-mentioned William Kinsey, born about 1498, had a son who continued the elder line,

11. John Kinsey, of Blackden, who was the father of,

12. William Kinsey, of Blackden, who married in 1593, Jane, daughter of James Knotsford of Twemlowe, and had,

13. Thomas Kinsey, of Blackden, gentleman, who by his marriage with Katherine.........had two daughters, coheiresses.

I. Margery, who married Thomas Baskerville of Old Withington and Blackden, born at Goosetree, March 2, 1590. He was the ancestor of the Baskervilles of Virginia.

II. Alice, who married Hugh Holingshed of Heywood, gentleman.

With these co-heiresses the elder line inheriting the Goosetree estates came to an end.

The second branch was founded py Philip Kinsey of Blackden, living c. 1550-1575, son of William, who had a great-grandson,

John Kinsey, who was aged 78 in 1663. He had a grandson, John Kinsy, who was living at the Visitations of the Heralds in 1663-64, aged 24.

In 1621 (July 27th) a Philip Kinsey, undoubtedly of this family, married Elizabeth Deane. (Cheshire Marriage Licenses).

The third branch of the Kinseys was represented by a John Kinsey who, about 1660 married Elizabeth, coheiress and aunt of Johnathan Eaton of Blackden. The arms of Goosetree were borne by this branch, as well as the arms of Eaton.

Arms of Eaton: Quarterly, argent and gules, a cross patonce counterchanged, in the first quarter a mullet gules.

Ormerod states that the above-mentioned John Kinsey, living 1660, was probably a descendant of Robert and Annis Goosetree Kinsey, as the arms of Goosetree quartered by the said John indicates.

About 1686 Thomas Kinsey, Squire of Blackden, married Anne, daughter of Thomas Swettendon, or Swettenham.

Another branch of this family was seated at Lower Peover and Middlewich. Lower Peover is five miles west of Blackden.

September 30, 1620, Ralfe Kinsey of Lower Peover married Jane Chester at Middlewich. From this time on the name of Ralph was preserved in the family. Dorothy Kinsey of the same place, married October 3, 1628, Philip Wright, Ralph Kinsey of Lower Peover being her bondsman.

11. Philip Kinsey of Lower Peover, probably indentical with Philip whom Ormerod calls of Blackden, had two sons:

I. Philip

II. Ralph, probably the Ralph, or the father of Ralph, who married Jane Chester in 1620.

and a grandson, John

For the following connection we are indebted to Mr. Ronald Stuart Kinsey of Cardiff, Wales, who is descended from this family, and who has discovered that the Kinseys of Pennsylvania have the same descent. The prevalence of the name Ralph in both branches and their use of the Blackden arms, argues in favor of his statements. A Ralph Kinsey of London was a purchaser, October 29, 1681, of one hundred and twenty-five acres of land from William Penn in Pennsylvania. His eldest son and heir, John Kinsey of London, sold the same and as far as we know did not come over.

13. John Kinsey, grandson of Philip above mentioned, whether the son of Philip or Ralph is not stated, but probably the son of Ralph, settled in Wales, at a place called Dethienith, near Landinam and Radnor in Montgomery-shire about 30-40 miles from Blackden, and was the ancestor of the Welsh family to which Mr. Ronald Stuart Kinsey belongs. He died 1619 leaving a will from which it appears he had five sons and two daughters, as follows:

Thomas; Edmund I; William; John, Morris; Margaret; and Maud.

14. Thomas of Dethienith, who died about 1640, had:

David I; Thomas; Robert, who emigrated to Virginia about 1642, and died there without issue, 1656; Edward, who also went to Virginia, but probably did not stay there as he was the ancestor of the Kinseys of Cardiff, Wales; Hugh, who went to Virginia in 1655 and had descendants.

15. David Kinsey I, of Dethienith, was the father of:

John; Ralph; Edmund II

16. John Kinsey I, of New Jersey, was one of the commissioners for the settlement of New Jersey under the purchase of Edward Byllinge. This commission was selected by a group of Yorkshire Friends who had acquired an interest in New Jersey. He arrived in the ship "Kent," at New Castle, Delaware June 16, 1677, then proceeded up the Delaware to the location where the present city of Burlington was founded. At Shackamaxon, where Penn later made his famous treaty with the Indians, John Kinsey made a selection and bargain with Peter Cock, the Swedish Deputy, for the purchase of three hundred acres of land situated above the mouth of the Schuykill River, near Shackamaxon, in what was later Philadelphia. He died soon after his arrival; the following is the first death recorded in Burlington, New Jersey:

"John Kinsey, alias Kelsey, Latte of Hadnam in Hartfordshire being taken w a violent feavor & Payne in the Bowles about 8 days Passed out of ye Body ye 11th of ye 8th mo & was Layd in ye ground ye 14th of ye same year 1677."

The fact that this record refers to John Kinsey as otherwise Kelsey, leads us to conjucture whether or not he was the Quaker Preacher called John Kelsey who went to Turkey as a missionary in the reign of Charles II. It would be interesting to prove this identity.

 Note: This book now begins to tie into the information we already have, listing families beginning with John Kinsey born March (they have the year 1678, we have 1677) and his children.

 Children of JOHN KINSEY and (fnu) KINSEY are:

7. i. DAVID7 KINSEY, b. ABT 1640, Nantmeal, Radnorshire, Wales; d. July 7, 1687, Haverford, Montgomery, PA.

ii. JOHN KINSEY, d. June 28, 1689.

iii. BENJAMIN KINSEY.

iv. ELIZABETH KINSEY, m. THOMAS FAIRMAN, October 24, 1680.

 

Generation No. 7 

7. DAVID7 KINSEY (JOHN6, DAVID5, THOMAS4, JOHN3, RALPH2, PHILIP1) was born ABT 1640 in Nantmeal, Radnorshire, Wales, and died July 7, 1687 in Haverford, Montgomery, PA. He married MAGDELEN MNU KINSEY 1680 in Haverford, Montgomery, PA.

 Notes

This information came from chapter IV of "A Family History", by Martha Jane Humphries Kinsey.

 David Kinsey of the Parish of Nantmeal, County of Radnor, Wales, a carpenter by trade, came from Bristol, England, to Philadelphia, bringing a certificate from the Friends Meeting at Bristol, dated June 26, 1682. This certificate does not name a wife, and he was probably married in or near Philadelphia within a year of his arrival, to Magdalen (there is no record of Magdalen Kinsey's maiden name). A deed records his purchase of one hundred acres of land from Richard Davies, and from the records of the Board of Property, we learn that a tract of three hundred acres was laid out to David Kinsey in Radnor Township in the Welsh Tract, and in right thereof, the town lot to which he was entitled, was laid out on Chestnut Street, a part of the present site of Independence hall. This tract, however, was never patented to David but after his death was conveyed in several parts to his widow and his son "on ye 20th day of 9th mo., 1690." David Kinsey was a member of the Society of Friends and was affiliated with the monthly meeting known at different periods as Radnor, Haverford, and Merion Monthly Meeting. Among the records of this monthly meeting there is a list of burials at "The Burying Place of Haverford, west side of the Schuylkill," and on the list is this record: "David Kinsey buried ye 7th day of the 7th mo., 1687."

 His wife, Magdalene, recieved letters of administration of his estate, but later disposed of the land in Radnor also a lot in Philadelphia granted David Kinsey by warrant, dated March 29, 1683. It is interesting to know this lot was in the block on which Independence Hall stands.

 She signed the marriage certificate of John Kinsey and Sarah Steven in the space for family members in 1687, thus proving her kinship to John Kinsey. She was an active Quaker in Radnor Meeting where her name often appears on marriage certificates. She married secondly Howell James on 20 November 1690. He was then of Radnor, and later of Bristol township, Bucks Co. PA, and then New Castle Co., Delaware where he died in 1717. Magdalene had died several years before him. David and Magdalene Kinsey had at least one other child, Edmund, who eventually founded the well known Bucks County branch of the Kinsey family. There may have also been a daughter named Elinor.

 After the death of David Kinsey, Magdalen Kinsey, his widow, married, secondly Howell James, widower of Radnor Township. The marriage took place at the house of David Price under the auspices of the Radnow Monthly Meeting. The certificate of marriage is recorded in full with the names of twenty-five witnesses, one of whom was John Kinsey, son of the bride. Magdalen Kinsey James died sometime prior to March, 1715.

 Howell James married thirdly, Phoebe More, on March 25, 1715. He lived for some years in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, later removing to New Castle County, where he served as overseer of New castle Preparative Meeting. An indulged meeting was held at his house which was discontinued July 7, 1717, "our Friend Howell Kinsey being deceased."

 The children of David Kinsey and Magdlen Kinsey were:

1. John Kinsey

2. Elinore Kinsey

3. Edmund Kinsey

 Children of DAVID KINSEY and MAGDELEN KINSEY are:

i. ELINORE8 KINSEY, m. THOMAS WOOLASTON, 1713, Kennett.

ii. JOHN KINSEY, b. ABT 1665; d. January 22, 1733/34; m. (1) SARAH STEVENS , (STIVENS), August 20, 1687, Philadelphia Monthly Meeting; m. (2) GRACE FITZRANDOLF, March 1, 1703/04.

iii. EDMUND KINSEY, b. 1683, Philadelphia PA; d. December 24, 1759, Buckingham, Bucks Co, PA; m. SARAH OGBORNE, August 28, 1708, Woodridge, Bergen Co, NJ.