Georgetown

Georgetown

Georgetown.-This village, which was a flourishing trading place in ante bellum days, is in section 16, and was laid out in 1835, by David Thomson, father of Martin Thomson. The name was given it by David Thomson, who came here in 1883 from Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky. David Thomson and his two brothers-in-law, George R. Smith and Lewis R. Major, were camped on the Lamine River, on the night of November 12, 1833, and witnessed the meteoric showers, which produced great consternation among the ignorant classes of those times. The land on which the town is built is high and rolling, and was a beautiful place when the town was in its glory. The old brick court house stood on the public square. The following streets appear on the plat: Pin Oak, Flint, Boonville, Post Oak, Franklin, Walnut, Saline and Cedar. The additions were known as Ramey and Wasson's, David Thomson's, George R. Smith and Hughes. The first lawyers of this village were William H. Field, Reese Hughes, John F. Philips, George G. Vest, Alda A. Glasscock, William Ford, Curtis Field and Charles A. Hardin. 

The postoffice was established here co-existent with the town. For several years the mails were weekly and monthly. In those days there was but little correspondence, and the great power of the press did not weigh upon the people then as now. The following is the list of the early postmasters: Albin Robinson, Amos Fristoe, Samuel A. Lowe, James P. Walker, William W. Cross, Thomas Hill, M. Hunt, James Austin, John E. Rector, Charles W. Barrick. For several years Georgetown was the center of trade for many miles around, but when the line of the Missouri Pacific railroad was laid out, the people all came to Sedalia to trade and to worship. E. J. Erskine and Frank Simmons are the business men of the village. 

(History of Pettis County Missouri by Mark A McGruder 1919)

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