Gallagher Biographies
BIOGRAPHIES

Here are biographies of well known O'Gallaghers throughout the ages, plus those who may be not so well known, but should be.  Biographies are added as they are submitted or found.  If you wish to submit a biography, please write me here.


GALLAGHER
GALLAGHER, Charles Wesley GALLAGHER, James, Rev. GALLAGHER, Patrick S.
GALLAGHER, Hugh P. GALLAGHER, James Nestor GALLAGHER, Thomas
GALLAGHER, Hugh Patrick GALLAGHER, Nicholas Aloysius GALLAGHER, William Davis
GALLAGHER, James A. GALLAGHER, Nicholas Aloysius GALLAGHER, William James
 
GALLEHER
GALLEHER, John Nicholas GALLEHER, John Nicholas
GALLINGER
GALLINGER, Jacob Harold GALLINGER, Jacob Harold GALLINGER, Jacob Harold

Biographical Works:

Herringshaw's Encyclopedia of American Biography, 1902
Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
The Continental Congress, 1774-1788
The Congress of the United States, 1789-1949
American Biographical Notes, 1875Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary
of Notable Americans: Volume I, 1903


NOTE: The above biographies were taken from various sources such as CD collections and so forth.  Most of these books are now out of print.  Readers have noted minor discrepancies in spelling and, for instance, the fact that Charles Wesley Gallagher is not listed in the records of Lawrence University as having been a past president of that college.  Nevertheless, the compiler feels that the information presented is accurate as far as the truth was known to the publishers of these biographies.

 

Herringshaw's Encyclopedia of American Biography
of the Nineteenth Century

Thomas William Herringshaw, Encyclopedia of American Biography

ACCURATE AND SUCCINCT BIOGRAPHIES OF FAMOUS MEN AND WOMEN IN ALL WALKS OF LIFE WHO ARE OR HAVE BEEN THE ACKNOWLEDGED LEADERS OF LIFE AND THOUGHT OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE ITS FORMATION, ENTIRELY COVERING THE FIELD OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, HISTORY, POLITICS, COMMERCE, AND THE MECHANICAL AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
ILLUSTRATED WITH PORTRAITS.
EDITED AND COMPILED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF
THOMAS WILLIAM HERRINGSHAW,


CHICAGO, ILL.:
AMERICAN PUBLISHERS' ASSOCIATION, 1902.

ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1898,
BY THOMAS WILLIAM HERRINGSHAW,
IN THE OFFICE OF THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS, AT WASHINGTON, D.C.

***


GALLAGHER, CHARLES WESLEY, clergyman, college president, was born Feb. 3, 1846, in Boston, Mass. During 1889-93 he was president of the Lawrence university of Wisconsin; and since 1893 has been president of the Maine Wesleyan seminary and College of Kent's Hill.  NOTE: See also this entry

Thomas William Herringshaw, Encyclopedia of American Biography, p.389


GALLAGHER, HUGH P., clergyman, philanthropist, was born in 1815, in Ireland. In 1844 he was made president of the Theological seminary of Pittsburgh, Pa. The same year he founded St. Francis' college for boys, and also founded and edited the Pittsburgh Catholic. In 1850 he introduced the sisters of mercy, for whom he established St. Aloysius' academy for girls. In 1852 he moved to California, built a church in Benicia; and in 1853 established the Catholic Standard. He died in March, 1882, in San Francisco, Cal.

Thomas William Herringshaw, Encyclopedia of American Biography, p.389


GALLAGHER, JAMES NESTOR, merchant, author, poet, was born July 5, 1848, in Concord, New Hampshire. He is the author of a humorous work entitled Let 'er Go, Gallagher; and a volume of poems.

Thomas William Herringshaw, Encyclopedia of American Biography, p.389


GALLAGHER , NICHOLAS ALOYSIUS, college president, bishop, was born Feb. 19, 1846, in Temperanceville, Ohio. He was ordained priest in 1868, and consecrated bishop of Galveston, Texas, in 1882. For many years he was president of St. Aloysius Seminary of Columbus, Ohio.

Thomas William Herringshaw, Encyclopedia of American Biography, p.389


GALLAGHER, PATRICK S., educator, was born in May, 1855, in Ireland. He attended the Business College of La Crosse, Wis., and has attained success in educational work. For the past eight years he has been superintendent of schools in Swift County, Minn.

Thomas William Herringshaw, Encyclopedia of American Biography, p.389

GALLAGHER, WILLIAM DAVIS, journalist, author, poet, was born Aug. 21, 1808, in Philadelphia, Pa. He received his education at the Lancasterian Seminary of Cincinnati, Ohio. He commenced life as a printer, then became a proofreader; and subsequently filled the editorial chair on a Cincinnati daily newspaper. He published The Quarterly Review, and was prominent in the early literary annals of the Ohio valley. He was the author of Miami Woods, and Other Poems; A Golden Wedding, and Other Poems; and Erato, a volume of verse. He died in 1894 in Louisville, Ky.

GALLEHER, JOHN NICHOLAS, bishop, was born Feb. 17, 1839, in Mason County, Ky. He was the third Protestant Episcopal bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana. He died Dec. 7, 1891, in New Orleans, La.

GALLINGER, JACOB H., journalist, physician, congressman, United States senator, was born March 28, 1837, in Canada. He practiced medicine and surgery from 1858 until he entered public life, and is a member of various state and national medical societies. He was a member of the House of Representatives of New Hampshire in 1872-73 and 1891; and was a member of the New Hampshire State Senate in 1878-80, being president of that body the last two years. He was surgeon-general of New Hampshire with the rank of brigadier-general in 1879-80. He was chairman of the delegation from his state to the Republican national convention of 1888. He was elected to the forty-ninth and fiftieth congresses as a Republican, and declined re-nomination to the fifty-first congress, and was elected United States senator in 1890, and was re-elected in 1896.

 

Biographical Directory
of the
American Congress

1774-1949
The Continental Congress
September 5, 1774 to October 21, 1788
and
The Congress of the United States

From the First to the Eightieth Congress
March 4, 1789 to January 3, 1949, Inclusive
United States Government Printing Office 1950 [p.759] 


GALLAGHER, James A., a Representative from Pennsylvania; born in Philadelphia, Pa., January 16, 1869; attended the public schools and Pierce Business College, Philadelphia, Pa., 1891-1893; engaged in merchandise warehousing and transportation since 1886; also engaged in banking; elected as a Republican to the Seventy-eighth Congress (January 3, 1943-January 3, 1945); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1944 to the Seventy-ninth Congress; elected in 1946 to the Eightieth Congress (January 3, 1947-January 3, 1949); unsuccessful candidate for re-nomination in 1948; resumed his former business pursuits; is a resident of Philadelphia, Pa.

Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949; Biographies, pg. 1191


GALLAGHER, Thomas, a Representative from Illinois; born in Concord, Merrimack County, N. H., July 6, 1850; moved to Chicago in 1866; attended the public schools; learned the trade of iron molder; entered the hat business in Chicago in 1878; director of the Cook County State Savings Bank; member of the city council of Chicago 1893-1897; member of the board of education 1897-1903; chairman of the Democratic central committee of Cook County in 1902; president of the Democratic county committee in 1906 and 1907 and a member of the executive committee in 1909, 1911, and 1913; elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-first and to the five succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1909-March 3, 1921); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1920 to the Sixty-seventh Congress; retired from active pursuits and resided in Chicago, Ill.; died February 24, 1930, in San Antonio, Tex., while on a visit; interment in St. Boniface Cemetery, Chicago, Ill.

GALLAGHER, William James, a Representative from Minnesota; born in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minn., May 13, 1875; attended the public schools, and was graduated from North High School in 1894; engaged as an editorial employee and proofreader in Minneapolis, Minn., in 1895 and 1896; moved to Spokane, Wash., in 1897 and continued his former pursuits with a labor journal until 1899; returned to Minneapolis, Minn., and engaged as a trucker and clerk in freight houses until 1919; employed as a street sweeper for Hennepin County 1919-1927 and for the city of Minneapolis, Minn., from 1927 until his retirement in 1942; was elected as a Democrat to the Seventy-ninth Congress and served from January 3, 1945, until his death; had been re-nominated to the Eightieth Congress in 1946; died in a hospital at Rochester, Minn., August 13, 1946; interment in Crystal Lake Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.

GALLINGER, Jacob Harold, a Representative and a Senator from New Hampshire; born in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, March 28, 1837; attended the common schools and completed an academic course; became a printer in early life; studied medicine, and was graduated from the Cincinnati (Ohio) Medical Institute in 1858; studied abroad for two years; returned to [p.1192] the United States and engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Concord, N. H., in April 1862; member of the State House of Representatives in 1872, 1873, and 1891; member of the State Constitutional Convention in 1876; served in the State Senate 1878-1880, and was president of that body the last two years; was surgeon general of New Hampshire, with the rank of brigadier general, in 1879 and 1880; chairman of the Republican State committee from 1882 to 1890, when he resigned; again elected to the position in 1898, 1900, 1902, 1904, and 1906; resigned in 1908; chairman of the delegation from New Hampshire to the Republican National Conventions in 1888, 1900, 1904, and 1908; chairman of the Merchant Marine Commission in 1904 and 1905; elected as a Republican to the Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Congresses (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1889); declined to be a candidate for reelection in 1888 to the Fifty-first Congress; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1891; reelected in 1897, 1903, 1909, and 1914, and served from March 4, 1891, until his death in Franklin, N. H., August 17, 1918; interment in Blossom Hill Cemetery, Concord, N. H.

American Biographical Notes
Being Short Notices of Deceased Persons,
Chiefly Those Not Included in Allen's or in Drake's Biographical Dictionaries

Gathered From Many Sources and Arranged By
Franklin B. Hough
Albany:
Joel Munsell
1875


GALLAGHER, REV. JAMES, a Universalist clergyman; d. at Hamilton, O., July 11, 1857.

***


THE TWENTIETH CENTURY BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF NOTABLE AMERICANS: VOLUME I-4

BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES OF AUTHORS ADMINISTRATORS, CLERGYMEN COMMANDERS, EDITORS, ENGINEERS JURISTS, MERCHANTS, OFFICIALS PHILANTHROPISTS, SCIENTISTS STATESMEN, AND OTHERS WHO ARE MAKING AMERICAN HISTORY

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
ROSSITER JOHNSON, PH.D., LL.D.

EDITOR OF THE ANNUAL CYCLOPÆDIA AND ASSOCIATE EDITOR OF THE AMERICAN CYCLOPÆDIA
MANAGING EDITOR
JOHN HOWARD BROWN
WITH WHOM ARE ASSOCIATED MANY EMINENT CONTRIBUTORS
NEW YORK, December 24, 1903. [p.v]



Contributors:
Charles Wesley Gallagher, DD, Former President of Lawrence University, Appleton, Wis.


GALLAGHER, Charles Wesley, educator, was born in Boston, Mass., Feb 3, 1846; son of Samuel Chartres and Rooxby Moody (Foster) Gallagher; and grandson of Hugh and Elizabeth (Chartres) Gallagher of Sackville, N.B., and of Jacob and Betsey (Ingalls) Foster of Andover, Mass. 

His first ancestors in America were Ephraim Foster who came to Andover, Mass., about 1700, and Hugh Gallagher, who came to Sackville, New Brunswick, about 1775. His parents went to Salem, N. H., in his infancy, and remained there until 1860, when they [p.223] removed to Chelsea, Mass. 

He was graduated from Wesleyan university in 1870, and entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church serving in various churches in New York and Connecticut, 1870-79, and in Massachusetts, 1880-89, officiating as presiding elder for two years in the New England southern conference. In 1889, he became president of Lawrence university, Appleton, Wis., resigning in 1893 to accept the presidency of Maine Wesleyan seminary and college, Kents Hill, Maine. In 1897 he accepted a position in Lasell seminary, Auburndale, Mass. 

He was married in 1876 to Emilie Eliza Hubbard of Brooklyn, N.Y., who died in 1890. He was later married to Evangeline Coscarden of Providence, R.I. He twice represented his conference in the General conference of the Methodist Episcopal church; and he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity. from the Little Rock University, Ark. His published writings consist of contributions to religious periodicals, and God Revealed, or Nature's Best Word (1899); adopted in the reading course of the Epworth League of the M. E. Church. 

The 20th Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 4, p.222


GALLAGHER, Hugh Patrick, educator, was born in County Donegal, Ireland, in 1815. He directed his education with a view to the priesthood and on emigrating to America in 1837 completed his studies at the theological seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, Overbrook, Pa., in 1840; meanwhile filling the chair of classics in the seminary. 

In 1840 he was ordained priest and assigned to St. Patrick's Church, Pottsville, Pa. Here among other reforms he formed a temperance society with 5000 members. 

In 1844 he was elected president of the theological seminary then established in Pittsburg, had charge of one of the largest churches of the city; and founded and edited the Pittsburg Catholic. 

He founded St. Francis's college for boys, and in 1850, Mt. St. Aloysius's academy for girls at Loretto, Pa., which he placed under the charge of the Sisters of Mercy, introduced to the diocese by him in 1843, when St. Mary's convent, the mother-house of Pittsburg, was founded. The sisters afterward built Mr. St. Aloysius's Convent of Mercy at Loretto, near Cresson, Pa., the mother house of the order there. 

He was theologian to the first plenary council of Baltimore, 1852, and after the council adjourned he went to California where he built St. Dominic's church at Benicia, helped to complete St. Mary's cathedral at San Francisco, and laid the foundation for the church of the Immaculate Conception at Oakland. 

He established and edited the Catholic Standard in 1853, the pioneer Roman Catholic newspaper on the Pacific coast. 

He visited Europe in 1853, where he obtained a number of priests, Sisters of Mercy and Presentation nuns for his proposed churches, schools and hospitals in California. He also secured large donations of money to be used in his proposed work. 

On the failure of Adams's express and banking company in 1855, which impoverished so many of the working classes in California, Father Gallagher, by unanimous consent, was made the future custodian of their funds and while he acted in this capacity millions of dollars were safely entrusted to his care. 

In 1860 his health demanded a change and he went to Yreka, where he built St. Peter and Paul's church, also churches at Carson City, Reno and Virginia City, afterward included in the diocese of Sacramento. On returning to San Francisco in 1861, he established the parish of St. Joseph, building a church, two school houses and a chapel to St. Vincent's school. 

He founded St. Mary's hospital, and in 1865, the Magdalen asylum, placing both under the charge of the Sisters of Mercy. He died in San Francisco, Cal., in March, 1882. 

GALLAGHER, Nicholas Aloysius, R.C. bishop, was born in Temperanceville, Ohio, Feb. 19, 1846; son of John and Mary Ann (Brinton) Gallagher, and grandson of Edmund Gallagher. 

He made his studies for the priesthood at Mt. St. Mary's seminary of the West, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1862-68, and was ordained priest, Christmas. 1868, in Holy Cross church, Columbus, Ohio, by Bishop Rosencrans. He was assistant priest at St. Patrick's church, Columbus, 1868-71; president of St. Aloysius seminary, Columbus, 1871-76; pastor of St. Patrick's church, Columbus, 1876-78, and administrator of the diocese, 1878-80. 

Bishop Watterson appointed him vicar-general of the diocese, and he served, 1880-82. He was consecrated bishop of Canopus, April 30, 1882; administrator of the diocese of Galveston, 1882-92, succeeding the Rt. Rev. C. M. Dubuis, D.D., resigned, and was appointed bishop of Galveston, Dec. 16, 1892, when Titular Bishop Dubuis was promoted to an archbishopric. 

The 20th Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 4, p.223


GALLEHER, John Nicholas, third bishop of Louisiana and 124th in succession in the American episcopate, was born in Washington, Ky., Feb. 17, 1839. 

He was prepared for college in the schools of Maysville, Ky., and was graduated at the University of Virginia in 1859. He taught one year at Lake Providence, La., and served in the Confederate Army in the command of General Buckner, receiving promotion to staff positions, as assistant adjutant-general, adjutant-general, chief-of-staff and lieutenant-colonel. 

After the close of the war he attended the law school connected with the Washington and Lee university, Va., 1865-66. He practiced in Louisville in company with Col. Robert Wooley; and then deciding to enter the ministry he studied at the General theological seminary of the Protestant Episcopal church, 1867-68, was ordained deacon, June 7, 1868, and priest, May 30, 1869. 

He was assistant minister at Christ Church, Louisville, Ky., in 1868; rector of Trinity church, New Orleans, La., 1869-71; of St. John's Memorial Church, Baltimore. Md., 1871-73, and of Zion Church, New York city, 1873-80. He was elected to the bishopric of Louisiana as successor to the [p.227] Rt. Rev. Joseph Pere Bell Wilmer, deceased, in 1879, and was consecrated, Feb. 5, 1880, by Bishops Green, R. H. Wilmer, Robertson and Dudley in Trinity church, New Orleans, La. 

He was a trustee of the University of the South, and received the degree of D.D. from that institution in 1880 and from Columbia in 1875. 

He was married to Lottie, daughter of John Barber, mayor of Louisville, Ky., and had three sons and two daughters. His health failing in April, 1891, he was given an assistant in the person of his son-in-law, the Rev. Davis Sessums, rector of Christ church, New Orleans, who was consecrated, June 14, 1891, and succeeded to the bishopric upon the death of Bishop Galleher, in New Orleans, La., Dec. 7, 1891.

The 20th Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 4, p.226

GALLINGER Jacob Harold, senator, was born in Cornwall, Ontario, March 28, 1837; son of Jacob and Catharine (Cook) Gallinger; and of Dutch ancestry, his paternal grandfather having emigrated from Holland previous to the Revolutionary war, first settling in New York and afterward in Canada. 

He attended the public schools and learned the trade of a printer. 

He was graduated an M.D. from the Medical institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1858, and after two years of travel and study he removed to Concord, N.H., where he practiced medicine and surgery.

He was a representative in the state legislature in 1872, 1873 and 1891; was a member of the state constitutional convention in 1876, and of the state senate in 1878, 1879 and 1880, being president of that body the last two years. In 1879 he was made surgeon general of the state with the rank of brigadier general. 

He was chairman of the Republican state central committee, 1882-90, and was re-elected to the position in 1898. He was a Republican representative from New Hampshire in the 49th and 50th congresses, declining re-nomination to the 51st congress. He was chairman of the state delegation to the Republican national convention of 1888 and seconded the nomination of Benjamin Harrison. In 1891 he was elected U.S. senator and was re-elected in 1897, his term of service expiring March 3, 1903.

Dartmouth college conferred upon him the honorary degree of A.M. in 1885.

The 20th Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 4, p.227


 

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