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Sisson coat of arms

Is there a Sisson coat of arms?


At least two different Sisson coats of arms have been found published in old newspapers and other sources.

But are they "legitimate" or "real" or ..... ?

The subject of "coats of arms" has generated controversy among genealogy researchers. In general, coats of arms
should be considered a "fun" thing rather than anything "official."

Some good websites with insight on the issue are:

http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/columns/eastman/3538.asp
http://www.college-of-arms.gov.uk/faq.htm

http://www.CyndisList.com/myths.htm
(scroll down the page a bit)

Rob Sisson of Sturgis, Michigan, has contacted the College of Arms in London with direct inquiries specifically about
a  Sisson coat of arms. He received a report from H. E. Paston-Bedingfeld (the York Herald) on April 18, 2000, stating that
a search of the records showed an official register of Grants made or confirmed to "Sisson" was limited to a single individual currently
living in Yorkshire. Mr. Bedingfeld states that the entries in Burke's _The General Armory_ are not listed in any official source.

So those published coats of arms that you see from time to time don't have a historical basis. But they're pretty! So don't pay
for a copy, but enjoy it if you run across it!

****

A Sisson researcher in New Zealand descends from a Sisson family originating in the south of France. Marcus Jacob Sisson was born in France and was educated in Gloucester, England, at Segrave House. One letter notes a brother Jonathan of Marcus, returning from war.  Marcus had an only son Charles Philip Sisson. Charles' mother writes in a letter in the 1820s about hosting a ball for 60 people, and little Charles peeping through the balustrade on the stairs. This family has a family crest that has passed down through the family to the present day, and is used on cutlery, jewelry, and a seal.
(added April 13, 2002)

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